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Versión actual por: Nick ,

Texto:

It’s normal for it to happen within the first few seconds on the Dell desktops - most people don’t notice because they don’t know it happens. If it stays like that for more then 5-10 seconds and it’s a no boot situation, it’s usually a RAM or power supply issue. The startup RPM is not as aggressive as the Core 2 generation was, but it still happens and you can tell if you know what to listen for during POST.
 
The cheap common fault I’ve seen when it boots is fan swaps where someone usesdid a fan withswap and it provides insufficient PWM data since the machine is somewhat specific about what kind of PWM data it expects. When it isn’t providing RPM data, the fans assume there’s an issue and run them at 100% speed all the time, along with throwing a BIOS boot warning. If you see a boot error, start with the fan in question with these machines. CPU is 4-pin and rear fan is 3-pin and it needs to provide RPM data - stick to the Delta fans Dell uses as those provide the correct data.
The cheap common fault I’ve seen when it boots is fan swaps where someone usesdid a fan withswap and it provides insufficient PWM data since the machine is somewhat specific about what kind of PWM data it expects. When it isn’t providing RPM data, the fans assume there’s an issue and run them at 100% speed all the time, along with throwing a BIOS boot warning. If you see a boot error, start with the fan in question with these machines. CPU is 4-pin and rear fan is 3-pin and it needs to provide RPM data - stick to the Delta fans Dell uses as those provide the correct data.
 
For non-booting machines, the first thing I do is inspect the power supply for an issue (connection or physical problem) and replace it if it’s not due to something like the 4 pin 12V ATX/P4 power connector (P4=first machines to require it). That solves it most of the time with non-booting systems. '''NOTE: You have a huge issue - 2 different power supplies based on the factory CPU spec! Lower spec machines (i3/i5) use the stupid nonstandard supply like Lenovo, but the high end (i7) machines use the ATX 24-pin. PRAY IT HAS THE NORMAL ATX PART OR YOU NEED TO USE THE DELL PART.'''
 
If the power supply looks fine/non-standard unit, start with the RAM - that’s the second common cause for the full speed fan issue with a no boot condition. If you have 2 modules, removing one will usually work unless both are bad. When you replace it, don’t mix the good OEM modules with new retail ones - replace it as a matched set. Dell boards aren’t picky, but for normal users it just creates avoidable problems.
 
If none of those fix it, your motherboard is bad.

Estatus:

open

Editado por: Nick ,

Texto:

It’s normal for it to happen within the first few seconds on the Dell desktops - most people don’t notice because they don’t know it happens. If it stays like that for more then 5-10 seconds and it’s a no boot situation, it’s usually a RAM or power supply issue. The startup RPM is not as aggressive as the Core 2 generation was, but it still happens and you can tell if you know what to listen for during POST.
 
The cheap common fault I’ve seen is fan swaps where someone uses a fan with insufficient PWM data since the machine is somewhat specific about what kind of PWM data it expects. When it isn’t providing RPM data, the fans assume there’s an issue and run them at 100% speed all the time, along with throwing a BIOS warning up at boot timewarning. If you see a boot error, start with the fan in question with these machines. CPU is 4-pin and rear fan is 3-pin and it needs to provide RPM data - stick to the Delta fans Dell uses as those provide the correct data.
The cheap common fault I’ve seen is fan swaps where someone uses a fan with insufficient PWM data since the machine is somewhat specific about what kind of PWM data it expects. When it isn’t providing RPM data, the fans assume there’s an issue and run them at 100% speed all the time, along with throwing a BIOS warning up at boot timewarning. If you see a boot error, start with the fan in question with these machines. CPU is 4-pin and rear fan is 3-pin and it needs to provide RPM data - stick to the Delta fans Dell uses as those provide the correct data.
 
For non-booting machines, the first thing I do is inspect the power supply for an issue (connection or physical problem) and replace it if it’s not due to something like the 4 pin 12V ATX/P4 power connector (P4=first machines to require it). That solves it most of the time with non-booting systems. '''NOTE: You have a huge issue - 2 different power supplies based on the factory CPU spec! Lower spec machines (i3/i5) use the stupid nonstandard supply like Lenovo, but the high end (i7) machines use the ATX 24-pin. PRAY IT HAS THE NORMAL ATX PART OR YOU NEED TO USE THE DELL PART.'''
 
If the power supply looks fine/non-standard unit, start with the RAM - that’s the second common cause for the full speed fan issue with a no boot condition. If you have 2 modules, removing one will usually work unless both are bad. When you replace it, don’t mix the good OEM modules with new retail ones - replace it as a matched set. Dell boards aren’t picky, but for normal users it just creates avoidable problems.
 
If none of those fix it, your motherboard is bad.

Estatus:

open

Editado por: Nick ,

Texto:

It’s normal for it to happen within the first few seconds on the Dell desktops - most people don’t notice because they don’t know it happens. If it stays like that for more then 5-10 seconds and it’s a no boot situation, it’s usually a RAM or power supply issue. The startup RPM is not as aggressive as the Core 2 generation was, but it still happens and you can tell if you know what to listen for during POST.
 
The cheap common fault I’ve seen is fan swaps where someone uses a fan with insufficient PWM data since the machine is somewhat specific about what kind of PWM data it expects. When it isn’t providing RPM data, the fans assume there’s an issue and run them at 100% speed all the time, along with throwing a BIOS warning up at boot time. If you see a boot error, start with the fan in question with these machines. CPU is 4-pin and rear fan is 3-pin and it needs to provide RPM data - stick to the Delta fans Dell uses as those provide the correct data.
 
For non-booting machines, the first thing I do is inspect the power supply for an issue (connection or physical problem) and replace it if it’s not due to something like the 4 pin 12V ATX/P4 power connector (P4=first machines to require it). That solves it most of the time with non-booting systems. '''NOTE: You have a huge issue - 2 different power supplies based on the factory CPU spec! Lower spec machines (i3/i5) use the stupid nonstandard supply like Lenovo, but the high end (i7) machines use the ATX 24-pin. PRAY IT HAS THE NORMAL ATX PART OR YOU NEED TO USE THE DELL PART.'''
For non-booting machines, the first thing I do is inspect the power supply for an issue (connection or physical problem) and replace it if it’s not due to something like the 4 pin 12V ATX/P4 power connector (P4=first machines to require it). That solves it most of the time with non-booting systems. '''NOTE: You have a huge issue - 2 different power supplies based on the factory CPU spec! Lower spec machines (i3/i5) use the stupid nonstandard supply like Lenovo, but the high end (i7) machines use the ATX 24-pin. PRAY IT HAS THE NORMAL ATX PART OR YOU NEED TO USE THE DELL PART.'''
 
If the power supply looks fine/non-standard unit, start with the RAM - that’s the second common cause for the full speed fan issue with a no boot condition. If you have 2 modules, removing one will usually work unless both are bad. When you replace it, don’t mix the good OEM modules with new retail ones - replace it as a matched set. Dell boards aren’t picky, but for normal users it just creates avoidable problems.
 
If none of those fix it, your motherboard is bad.

Estatus:

open

Editado por: Nick ,

Texto:

It’s normal for it to happen within the first few seconds on the Dell desktops - most people don’t notice because they don’t know it happens. If it stays like that for more then 5-10 secondsseconds and it’s a no boot situation, it’s usually a RAM or power supply issue. The newer machines aren’tstartup RPM is not as aggressive as the older onesCore 2 generation was, but it still happens - likely so the machines can catch a fan issue and throw a POST erroryou can tell if something is wrongyou know what to listen for during POST.
It’s normal for it to happen within the first few seconds on the Dell desktops - most people don’t notice because they don’t know it happens. If it stays like that for more then 5-10 secondsseconds and it’s a no boot situation, it’s usually a RAM or power supply issue. The newer machines aren’tstartup RPM is not as aggressive as the older onesCore 2 generation was, but it still happens - likely so the machines can catch a fan issue and throw a POST erroryou can tell if something is wrongyou know what to listen for during POST.
 
The cheap common fault I’ve seen is fan swaps where someone uses a fan with false PWM,insufficient PWM data since the machine is somewhat specific about what kind of PWM data it expects. When it isn’t providing RPM data, the fans assume there’s an issue and run them at 100% speed all the time, along with throwing a BIOS warning up at boot time. If you see a boot error, start with the fan in question with these machines. CPU is 4-pin and rear fan is 3-pin3-pin and it needs to provide RPM data - stick to the Delta fans Dell uses as those provide the correct data.
The cheap common fault I’ve seen is fan swaps where someone uses a fan with false PWM,insufficient PWM data since the machine is somewhat specific about what kind of PWM data it expects. When it isn’t providing RPM data, the fans assume there’s an issue and run them at 100% speed all the time, along with throwing a BIOS warning up at boot time. If you see a boot error, start with the fan in question with these machines. CPU is 4-pin and rear fan is 3-pin3-pin and it needs to provide RPM data - stick to the Delta fans Dell uses as those provide the correct data.
 
TheFor non-booting machines, the first thing I usually do is inspect the power supply for an issue (connection or physical problem) and if I see anything wrong, replace it and that usuallyif it’s not due to something like the 12V ATX/P4 power connector (P4=first machines to require it). That solves it most of the issue. '''Youtime with non-booting systems. '''NOTE: You have a huge issue - 2 different power supplies based on the factory CPU spec! Lower spec machines (i3/i5) use the stupid nonstandard supply like Lenovo, but the high end (i7) machines use the ATX 24-pin. PRAY IT HAS THE NORMAL ATX PART OR YOU NEED TO USE THE DELL PART.'''
TheFor non-booting machines, the first thing I usually do is inspect the power supply for an issue (connection or physical problem) and if I see anything wrong, replace it and that usuallyif it’s not due to something like the 12V ATX/P4 power connector (P4=first machines to require it). That solves it most of the issue. '''Youtime with non-booting systems. '''NOTE: You have a huge issue - 2 different power supplies based on the factory CPU spec! Lower spec machines (i3/i5) use the stupid nonstandard supply like Lenovo, but the high end (i7) machines use the ATX 24-pin. PRAY IT HAS THE NORMAL ATX PART OR YOU NEED TO USE THE DELL PART.'''
 
If the power supply looks fine or it has the nonstandardfine/non-standard unit, start with the RAM - that’s the second common cause for the full speed fan issueissue with a no boot condition. If you have 2 modules, removing one will usually work unless both are bad. When you replace it, don’t mix the good OEM modules with new retail ones - replace it as a matched set. Dell boards aren’t picky, but for normal users it just creates avoidable problems.
If the power supply looks fine or it has the nonstandardfine/non-standard unit, start with the RAM - that’s the second common cause for the full speed fan issueissue with a no boot condition. If you have 2 modules, removing one will usually work unless both are bad. When you replace it, don’t mix the good OEM modules with new retail ones - replace it as a matched set. Dell boards aren’t picky, but for normal users it just creates avoidable problems.
 
If none of those fix it, your motherboard is bad.

Estatus:

open

Editado por: Nick ,

Texto:

It’s normal for it to happen within the first few seconds on the Dell desktops - most people don’t notice because they don’t know it happens. If it stays like that for more then 5-10 seconds, it’s usually a RAM or power supply issue. The newer machines aren’t as aggressive as the older ones, but it still happens - likely so the machines can catch a fan issue and throw a POST error if something is wrong.
It’s normal for it to happen within the first few seconds on the Dell desktops - most people don’t notice because they don’t know it happens. If it stays like that for more then 5-10 seconds, it’s usually a RAM or power supply issue. The newer machines aren’t as aggressive as the older ones, but it still happens - likely so the machines can catch a fan issue and throw a POST error if something is wrong.
 
The cheap common fault I’ve seen is fan swaps where someone uses a fan with false PWM, since the machine is somewhat specific about what kind of PWM data it expects. When it isn’t providing RPM data, the fans assume there’s an issue and run them at 100% speed all the time, along with throwing a BIOS warning up at boot time. If you see a boot error, start with the fan in question with these machines. CPU is 4-pin and rear fan is 3-pin.
 
The first thing I usually do is inspect the power supply and if I see anything wrong, replace it and that usually solves the issue. '''You have a huge issue - 2 different power supplies based on the factory CPU spec! Lower spec machines (i3/i5) use the stupid nonstandard supply like Lenovo, but the high end (i7) machines use the ATX 24-pin. PRAY IT HAS THE NORMAL ATX PART OR YOU NEED TO USE THE DELL PART.'''
 
If the power supply looks fine or it has the nonstandard unit, start with the RAM - that’s the second common cause for the full speed fan issue. If you have 2 modules, removing one will usually work unless both are bad.
 
If none of those fix it, your motherboard is bad.

Estatus:

open

Editado por: Nick ,

Texto:

It’s normal for it to happen within the first few seconds on the Dell desktops - most people don’t notice because they don’t know it happens. If it stays like that for more then 5-10 seconds, it’s usually a RAM or power supply issue.
 
The cheap common fault I’ve seen is fan swaps where someone uses a fan with false PWM, since the machine is somewhat specific about what kind of PWM data it expects. When it isn’t providing RPM data, the fans assume there’s an issue and run them at 100% speed all the time, along with throwing a BIOS warning up at boot time. If you see a boot error, start with the fan in question with these machines. CPU is 4-pin and rear fan is 3-pin.
 
The first thing I usually do is inspect the power supply and if I see anything wrong, replace it and that usually solves the issue. '''You have a huge issue - 2 different power supplies based on the factory CPU spec! Low endLower spec machines (i3/i5) use the stupid nonstandard supply like Lenovo, but the higherhigh end (i7) machines will use the ATX 24-pin. PRAY IT HAS THE NORMAL ATX PART OR YOU NEED TO USE THE DELL PART.'''
The first thing I usually do is inspect the power supply and if I see anything wrong, replace it and that usually solves the issue. '''You have a huge issue - 2 different power supplies based on the factory CPU spec! Low endLower spec machines (i3/i5) use the stupid nonstandard supply like Lenovo, but the higherhigh end (i7) machines will use the ATX 24-pin. PRAY IT HAS THE NORMAL ATX PART OR YOU NEED TO USE THE DELL PART.'''
 
If the power supply looks fine or it has the nonstandard unit, start with the RAM - that’s the second common cause for the full speed fan issue. If you have 2 modules, removing one will usually work unless both are bad.
 
If none of those fix it, your motherboard is bad.

Estatus:

open

Editado por: Nick ,

Texto:

It’s normal for it to happen within the first few seconds on the Dell desktops - most people don’t notice because they don’t know it happens. If it stays like that for more then 5-10 seconds, it’s usually a RAM or power supply issue.
 
The cheap common fault I’ve seen is fan swaps where someone uses a fan with false PWM, since the machine is somewhat specific about what kind of PWM data it expects. When it isn’t providing RPM data, the fans assume there’s an issue and run them at 100% speed all the time, along with throwing a BIOS warning up at boot time. If you see a boot error, start with the fan in question with these machines. CPU is 4-pin and rear fan is 3-pin.
 
The first thing I usually do is inspect the power supply and if I see anything wrong, replace it and that usually solves the issue. '''You have a huge issue - 2 different power supplies based on the factory CPU spec! Low end machines use the stupid nonstandard supply like Lenovo, but the higher end machines will use the ATX 24-pin. PRAY IT HAS THE NORMAL ATX PART OR YOU NEED TO USE THE DELL PART.'''
 
If the power supply looks fine or it has the nonstandard unit, start with the RAM - that’s the second common cause for the full speed fan issue. If you have 2 modules, removing one will usually work unless both are bad.
 
If neither fixesnone of those fix it, your motherboard is bad.
If neither fixesnone of those fix it, your motherboard is bad.

Estatus:

open

Editado por: Nick ,

Texto:

It’s normal for it to happen within the first few seconds on the Dell desktops - most people don’t notice because they don’t know it happens. If it stays like that for more then 5-10 seconds, it’s usually a RAM or power supply issue.
 
The cheap common fault I’ve seen is fan swaps where someone uses a fan with false PWM, since the machine is somewhat specific about what kind of PWM data it expects. When it isn’t providing RPM data, the fans assume there’s an issue and run them at 100% speed all the time, along with throwing a BIOS warning up at boot time. If you see a boot error, start with the fan in question with these machines. CPU is 4-pin and rear fan is 3-pin.
The cheap common fault I’ve seen is fan swaps where someone uses a fan with false PWM, since the machine is somewhat specific about what kind of PWM data it expects. When it isn’t providing RPM data, the fans assume there’s an issue and run them at 100% speed all the time, along with throwing a BIOS warning up at boot time. If you see a boot error, start with the fan in question with these machines. CPU is 4-pin and rear fan is 3-pin.
 
The first thing I usually do is inspect the power supply and if I see anything wrong, replace it and that usually solves the issue. '''You have a huge issue - 2 different power supplies based on the factory CPU spec! Low end machines use the stupid nonstandard supply like Lenovo, but the higher end machines will use the ATX 24-pin. PRAY IT HAS THE NORMAL ATX PART OR YOU NEED TO USE THE DELL PART.'''
 
If the power supply looks fine or it has the nonstandard unit, start with the RAM - that’s the second common cause for the full speed fan issue. If you have 2 modules, removing one will usually work unless both are bad.
 
If neither fixes it, your motherboard is bad.

Estatus:

open

Editado por: Nick ,

Texto:

It’s normal for it to happen within the first few seconds on the Dell desktops - most people don’t notice because they don’t know it happens. If it stays like that for more then 5-10 seconds, it’s usually a RAM or power supply issue.
 
The cheap common fault I’ve seen is fan swaps where someone uses a fan with false PWM, since the machine is somewhat specific about what kind of PWM data it expects. When it isn’t providing RPM data, the fans assume there’s an issue and run them at 100% speed all the time, along with throwing a BIOS warning up at boot time. If you see a boot error, start with the fan in question with these machines.
 
The first thing I usually do is inspect the power supply and if I see anything wrong, replace it and that usually solves the issue. '''You have a huge issue - 2 different power supplies based on the factory CPU spec! Low end machines use the stupid nonstandard supply like Lenovo, but the higher end machines will use the ATX 24-pin. PRAY IT HAS THE NORMAL ATX PART OR YOU NEED TO USE THE DELL PART.'''
 
If the power supply looks fine or it has the nonstandard unit, start with the RAM - that’s the second common cause for the full speed fan issue. If you have 2 modules, removing one will usually work unless both are bad.
 
If neither fixes it, your motherboard is bad.

Estatus:

open

Editado por: Nick ,

Texto:

It’s normal for it to happen within the first few seconds on the Dell desktops - most people don’t notice because they don’t know it happens. If it stays like that for more then 5-10 seconds, it’s usually a RAM or power supply issue.
 
The first thing I usually do is inspect the power supply and if I see anything wrong, replace it and that usually solves the issue. '''You have a huge issue - 2 different power supplies based on the factory CPU spec! Low end machines use the stupid nonstandard supply like Lenovo, but the higher end machines will use the ATX 24-pin. PRAY IT HAS THE NORMAL ATX PART OR YOU NEED TO USE THE DELL PART.'''
 
If the power supply looks fine or it has the nonstandard unit, start with the RAM - that’s the second common cause for the full speed fan issue. If you have 2 modules, removing one will usually work unless both are bad.
If the power supply looks fine or it has the nonstandard unit, start with the RAM - that’s the second common cause for the full speed fan issue. If you have 2 modules, removing one will usually work unless both are bad.
 
If neither fixes it, your motherboard is bad.

Estatus:

open

Aporte original por: Nick ,

Texto:

It’s normal for it to happen within the first few seconds on the Dell desktops - most people don’t notice because they don’t know it happens. If it stays like that for more then 5-10 seconds, it’s usually a RAM or power supply issue.

The first thing I usually do is inspect the power supply and if I see anything wrong, replace it and that usually solves the issue. '''You have a huge issue - 2 different power supplies based on the factory CPU spec! Low end machines use the stupid nonstandard supply like Lenovo, but the higher end machines will use the ATX 24-pin. PRAY IT HAS THE NORMAL ATX PART OR YOU NEED TO USE THE DELL PART.'''

If the power supply looks fine or it has the nonstandard unit, start with the RAM - that’s the second common cause for the full speed fan issue.

If neither fixes it, your motherboard is bad.

Estatus:

open