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My display shows "Thermal Error"

After a power outage my receiver won't turn on. It shows "Thermal Error" in the display for a few seconds and then turns off again. My guess is it was a voltage peak when the power got back on that killed it.

I tried contacting Pioneer, but they just told me to contact a service shop. That will probably cost more than it is worth so I will not do that, but still it will be a shame to have to throw away a 5 year old receiver if it easily can be fixed...

I tried searching for the schematics for it, but I had no luck.

Does anyone here know what this error is and how to fix it?

I live in Norway btw so it is rated for 240V if that makes a difference.

Update (10/06/2022)



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Update (10/07/2022)

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Is there anything stacked on top of the device, or is there anything surrounding the device like books or the wall of the shelf?

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No. It was standing on the same place since new, with plenty of air on all sides of it, and got this error after the power outage.

It also had been turned off since the day before when the error first occurred so there is no way it was too hot.

The error is there all the time now, regardless of placement.

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@mikaels Does the error continue if you disconnect your speakers?

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Yes. It is there even when nothing is connected to it.

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@mikaels No that blueish components looks like a capacitor.

The fuse is the components F9002B (glass fuse on the top right), I have added the picture you posted to my answer above, with red circles :)

Edit: The capacitor will show open loop (OL, meaning no connection) in normal state, and will only show a connection if it's blown (shorted). You can measure the capacitance with your DMM, if the meter has a capacitance measuring mode.

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Hi @mikaels

Do you have a decent DMM (digital multimeter)? One that can measure resistance (Ω), voltage and a diode mode (look for a symbol of an arrow with a line on the "pointy end" of the arrow.)

I can suggest watching 12voltvids on YouTube, he is a great guy and has a LOT of videos, also on diagnosing some audio equipment. The surge that happened as a result of the power outage, blew something inside the receiver, and you'll need to replace that (or those) part(s). Most likely some capacitors (the only obvious way to detect that, without an ESR meter, is to look at the top of the electrolytic capacitors to see if it's blown), and quite possibly one or more mosfets in there. You need to measure the mosfets for shorts.

NOTE!!! Some of the capacitors in the power part of the receiver are capable of holding hundreds of volts with fairly high farad ratings, which are DANGEROUS! Never touch the leads of the capacitors without making 110% sure that they are completely discharged! A multimeter can read the voltage contained in the capacitor, in the Voltage reading mode.

PS! I'm also a Norwegian ;)

Edit:

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See if you find this setup on your board. Red are the regulators and Blue are the corresponding inductors.

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I've tried measuring the mosfets (resistanse) and none of them are shorted.

None of the capacitors have any visible sings of being blown.

I have a Fluke 87 so I can measure diodes, but where to start?

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@mikaels I'm a Fluke man myself as well. You use the diode mode to measure between the drain and the source of the mosfet. If it's an N-channel, then positive on the source and negative on the drain; Opposite if it' P-channel.

This should show you a diode voltage drop, if it's working. Also, you can measure with continuity mode over fex gate and drain. If that produces a beep, then there's a short because that shouldn't be in continuity.

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@mikaels By the way, your receiver most likely has a thermal cutoff (a thermically engaged switch that turns on when a certain temp is reached). If that is blown and always on, you'll have this symptom.

I can't find the Service Manual for this receiver (which includes the schematics), so I can't see where it is :/

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That is what I thought it might be too. Asked Pioneer for the schematics for it, but the answer was very predictable - they don't give those out to anyone but their selected service shops...

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@mikaels A little more research on my end tells me that the Pioneer model is a twin model of the Onkyo TX-NR474 receiver, whose service manual does exist online, with schematics: Service Manual (I have tested the link and downloaded it, it's safe from what I can tell.)

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Try a microprocessor reset:
. While holding down AUTO/DIRECT on the front panel of the receiver,

press STANDBY/ON on the main unit.

"Clear" appears on the display and the unit returns to standby. After "Clear" disappears from the display, unplug the power cord for a few minutes.

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I have tried this, but it did not help.

Trouble is, this has to be done while the receiver is turned on so I just have a couple of seconds to do it before the error comes up. I have managed to make the "clear" message show in the display, but then it imminently switches to "thermal error" again...

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Mikael Samuelsen estará eternamente agradecido.
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