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Modelo A1224 / principios de 2009 / 2.66 GHz Procesador Core 2 Duo

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Can I use a WD10EZEX 1TB HDD with this iMac?

Hello experts,

I bought a 1TB WD drive WD10EZEX for my 2009 iMac.

Only after installation (and non-recognition) did the penny drop that it’s a SATA3 drive in a SATA2 iMac.

After a lot of reading and problem solving I found WD’s instructions regarding jumpers, these being used to limit the drive to 3GB/s.

Applying the jumper made no difference regarding boot up visibility.

The strange thing is that when the new drive is installed and the machine is booted from an external HDD via USB, the new drive is visible through Disk Utility, able to be formatted etc.

I then thought I had it sorted so used Carbon Copy to clone the old drive, and tried booting again from the new drive, no luck. In fact I can’t even get the machine to boot to any of the recovery options.

I’ve run though some problem solving options, including the internal power supply, and the internal SATA cable. I’ve searched for WD info and any data from the manufacturer assures me the drive can be jumpered to 3GB/s and is compatible.

Realising I may simply have hit a brick wall I’d none-the-less be grateful for any ideas or insights others may have.

For those who like full details of the kit involved, the iMac s/n is YM9212A00TF, and it is running 4GB 1067 MHz DDR3 RAM.

The Western Digital drive is a WD10EZEX “WDBlue PC Hard Drive.

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The spec sheet for your drive Western Digital WD Blue WD10EZEX 1TB HDD

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Sorry, this drive just won’t play well in your system as you discovered. Yes, it can appear to work and then as soon as you stress the drive it fails to work.

You’ll need to get another drive which is either a ‘Fixed’ SATA II (3.0 Gb/s) or one that has the technology to adjust its I/O speed to the systems SATA Port’s ability. We call these drives ‘Auto Sense’ As an example 3.5” Seagate FireCuda which is an Auto Sense drive. Note the ‘SATA Transfer Rates Supported (Gb/s)’ line which lists all three data rates ‘6.0/3.0/1.5’

Many HD makers are slowly reducing if not stopping making either Fixed or Auto Sense drives that work in SATA II (3.0 Gb/s) systems. The demand for them has dropped, just like how we now can’t locate the even older SATA I (1.5 Gb/s) or even the still older PATA drives. The world has moved on.

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Thank you Dan,

I hoped I’d hear from you as this is clearly an area of expertise for you.

What does intrigue me are the comments online about using jumper settings to limit the drive to 3GB/s.

Eg https://community.wd.com/t/running-6gb-s...

I’d be very interested to hear your opinion on jumper settings regarding this issue.

Kind regards,

Rob

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@whitsun - Ah, the jumpers! Not all drives offered the logic to alter the SATA I/O via a jumper. Even when the drive had the header the back side of the logic was just missing!

WD held onto the header for quite a few years after the I/O function was dropped as the internal manufacturing process leveraged the header for testing the drive and some WD customers used the drives internal thermal sensor. As an example iMac Intel 27" EMC 2309 and 2374 cambio de disco duro jump down to Step 10 where you can see Apple using it!

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Thanks Dan, I enjoy your comments on other posts too. Cheers, Rob

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Sounds like your golden! Enjoy your mac!

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