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Versión actual por: Nick ,

Texto:

From what I understand, the chipset supports 6GB. However, it does not mean all models support 6GB. Going to 6GB of RAM will depend on the model and firmware. This model particularly does not support it, so you are limited to 3GB.
 
If you do not care about stability or having your new memory downclock to the existing modules, you can save some money and reuse part of the old RAM. However, this is not the best idea since the machine probably came with 667MHz memory. You are likely better off buying 2 similar modules that are 2GB and 1GB in size. The new memory will not downclock this way, but if it's off just enough it can be a problem if you need system stability. If you need absolute stability, buy a 4GB matched pair. The big thing is to try and brand match and make sure the memory and CAS latencies are the samelatencies.
If you do not care about stability or having your new memory downclock to the existing modules, you can save some money and reuse part of the old RAM. However, this is not the best idea since the machine probably came with 667MHz memory. You are likely better off buying 2 similar modules that are 2GB and 1GB in size. The new memory will not downclock this way, but if it's off just enough it can be a problem if you need system stability. If you need absolute stability, buy a 4GB matched pair. The big thing is to try and brand match and make sure the memory and CAS latencies are the samelatencies.
 
However, even if you could the RAM would be expensive anyway. The cost of DDR2 in sticks larger then 2GB tends to be pretty expensive these days. Even if you could you would need to weigh the cost to get the memory to do it anyway. It will be much more cost effective to stop at 4GB nowadays.

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Editado por: Nick ,

Texto:

From what I understand, the chipset supports 6GB. However, it does not mean all models support 6GB. Going to 6GB of RAM will depend on the model and firmware. This model particularly does not support it, so you are limited to 3GB.
 
If you do not care about stability or having your new memory downclock to the existing modules, you can save some money and reuse part of the old RAM. However, this is not the best idea since the machine probably came with 667MHz memory. You are likely better off buying 2 similar modules that are 2GB and 1GB in size. The new memory will not downclock this way, but if it's off just enough it can be a problem if you need system stability. If you need absolute stability, buy a 4GB matched pair. The big thing is to brand match and make sure the CAS latencies are the same.
If you do not care about stability or having your new memory downclock to the existing modules, you can save some money and reuse part of the old RAM. However, this is not the best idea since the machine probably came with 667MHz memory. You are likely better off buying 2 similar modules that are 2GB and 1GB in size. The new memory will not downclock this way, but if it's off just enough it can be a problem if you need system stability. If you need absolute stability, buy a 4GB matched pair. The big thing is to brand match and make sure the CAS latencies are the same.
However, even if you could the RAM would be expensive anyway. The cost of DDR2 in sticks larger then 2GB tends to be pretty expensive these days. Even if you could you would need to weigh the cost to get the memory to do it anyway. It will be much more cost effective to stop at 4GB nowadays.

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Editado por: Nick ,

Texto:

From what I understand, the chipset supports 6GB. However, it does not mean all models support 6GB. Going to 6GB of RAM will depend on the model and firmware. This model particularly does not support it, so you are limited to 3GB.
If you do not care about stability, you can fudge the sticks and either get two matching modules in different capacities or reuse part of the RAM it came with. However, if you need stability you will want a matching set.
 
If you do not care about stability or having your new memory downclock to the existing modules, you can save some money and reuse part of the old RAM. However, this is not the best idea since the machine probably came with 667MHz memory. You are likely better off buying 2 similar modules that are 2GB and 1GB in size. The new memory will not downclock this way, but if it's off just enough it can be a problem if you need system stability. If you need absolute stability, buy a 4GB matched pair.
However, even if you could the RAM would be expensive anyway. The cost of DDR2 in sticks larger then 2GB tends to be pretty expensive these days. Even if you could you would need to weigh the cost to get the memory to do it anyway. It will be much more cost effective to stop at 4GB nowadays.

Estatus:

open

Editado por: Nick ,

Texto:

From what I understand, the chipset supports 6GB. However, it does not mean all models support 6GB. Going to 6GB of RAM will depend on the model and firmware. This model particularly does not support it, so you are limited to 3GB.
If you do not care about stability, you can fudge the sticks and either get two matching modules in different capacities or reuse part of the RAM it came with. However, if you need stability you will want a matching set.
 
However, even if you could the RAM would be expensive anyway. The cost of DDR2 in sticks larger then 2GB tends to be pretty expensive these days. Even if you could you would need to weigh the cost to get the memory to do it anyway. It will be much more cost effective to stop at 4GB nowadays.

Estatus:

open

Editado por: Nick ,

Texto:

From what I understand, the chipset supports 6GB. However, it does not mean all models support 6GB. Going to 6GB of RAM will depend on the model and firmware.
This
This model particularly does not support it, so you are limited to 3GB.
From what I understand, the chipset supports 6GB. However, it does not mean all models support 6GB. Going to 6GB of RAM will depend on the model and firmware.
This
This model particularly does not support it, so you are limited to 3GB.
However, even if you could the RAM would be expensive anyway. The cost of DDR2 in sticks larger then 2GB tends to be pretty expensive these days. Even if you could you would need to weigh the cost to get the memory to do it anyway. It will be much more cost effective to stop at 4GB nowadays.

Estatus:

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Editado por: Nick ,

Texto:

From what I understand, it takesthe chipset supports 6GB. However, it willdoes not go higher sincemean all models support 6GB. Going to 6GB is the limit forof RAM will depend on the chipset.

I don't think it's worth going to 6GB due
model and firmware.
This model particularly does not support it, so you are limited
to 3GB.
However, even if you could
the RAM would be expensive anyway. The cost of DDR2 in sticks larger then 2GB tends to be pretty expensive these days. IEven if you could you would go upneed to 4GB and putweigh the money away for something elsecost to get the memory to do it anyway. It will be much more cost effective to stop at 4GB nowadays.
From what I understand, it takesthe chipset supports 6GB. However, it willdoes not go higher sincemean all models support 6GB. Going to 6GB is the limit forof RAM will depend on the chipset.

I don't think it's worth going to 6GB due
model and firmware.
This model particularly does not support it, so you are limited
to 3GB.
However, even if you could
the RAM would be expensive anyway. The cost of DDR2 in sticks larger then 2GB tends to be pretty expensive these days. IEven if you could you would go upneed to 4GB and putweigh the money away for something elsecost to get the memory to do it anyway. It will be much more cost effective to stop at 4GB nowadays.

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Editado por: Nick ,

Texto:

From what I understand, it takes 6GB,6GB. However, it will not go higher since this6GB is the limit for the chipset in this MacBook Pro. chipset.
From what I understand, it takes 6GB,6GB. However, it will not go higher since this6GB is the limit for the chipset in this MacBook Pro. chipset.
I don't think it's worth going to 6GB due to the cost of DDR2 these days. I would go up to 4GB and put the money away for something else.

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Editado por: Nick ,

Texto:

ThisFrom what I understand, it takes 6GB, since this is athe limit for the chipset limitation. You can't fix a chipset limitation with custom firmwarein this MacBook Pro.
I don't think it's worth going to 6GB due to the cost of DDR2 these days. I would go up to 4GB and put the money away for something else
.
ThisFrom what I understand, it takes 6GB, since this is athe limit for the chipset limitation. You can't fix a chipset limitation with custom firmwarein this MacBook Pro.
I don't think it's worth going to 6GB due to the cost of DDR2 these days. I would go up to 4GB and put the money away for something else
.

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Editado por: Nick ,

Texto:

This is a chipset limit and there is no way toolimitation. You can't fix a chipset limitation with custom firmware.
This is a chipset limit and there is no way toolimitation. You can't fix a chipset limitation with custom firmware.

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Editado por: Nick ,

Texto:

This is a chipset limit and there is nowno way too
This is a chipset limit and there is nowno way too

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Aporte original por: Nick ,

Texto:

This is a chipset limit and there is now way too

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