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Versión actual por: Nick ,

Texto:

Your BIOS may be different from my Dell, but this is how I have mine setup for USB boot after I reinstalled Windows 10. I would try setting the following on it, but I will also give you visual clues. I HAVE seen this BIOS on a 9th gen Inspiron desktop, so I’m thinking Dell may have changed things in recent years and switched over to one BIOS skin.
 
* USB Configuration: Enable Boot Support and External USB boot
* Boot sequence: Make sure UEFI is enabled and Windows Boot Manager is first. UEFI Hard Drive should be next.
Once you make those changes, press F12 and select the USB flash drive. At this point, you should not have an issue but you may need to temporarily disable Secure Boot. I personally leave it off permanently, but it does have some security benefits for average users which justify re-enabling it. I sometimes run Linux on my systems, and few distros properly support it.
 
[image|2305976]
 
[image|2305977]
 
[image|2305975]
 
[image|2305983]

Estatus:

open

Editado por: Nick ,

Texto:

Your BIOS may be different from my Dell, but this is how I have mine setup for USB boot after I reinstalled Windows 10. I would try setting the following on it, but I will also give you visual clues. I HAVE seen this BIOS on a 9th gen Inspiron desktop, so I’m thinking Dell may have changed things in recent years and switched over to one BIOS skin.
 
* USB Configuration: Enable Boot Support and External USB boot
* Boot sequence: Make sure UEFI is enabled and Windows Boot Manager is first. UEFI Hard Drive should be next.
Once you make those changes, press F12 and select the USB flash drive. At this point, you should not have an issue but you may need to temporarily disable Secure Boot. I personally leave it off (basically permanently)permanently, but it does have some security benefits for average users which justify re-enabling it. I sometimes run Linux on my systems, and few distros properly support it.
Once you make those changes, press F12 and select the USB flash drive. At this point, you should not have an issue but you may need to temporarily disable Secure Boot. I personally leave it off (basically permanently)permanently, but it does have some security benefits for average users which justify re-enabling it. I sometimes run Linux on my systems, and few distros properly support it.
 
[image|2305976]
 
[image|2305977]
 
[image|2305975]

Estatus:

open

Editado por: Nick ,

Texto:

Your BIOS may be different from my Dell, but this is how I have mine setup for USB boot after I reinstalled Windows 10. I would try setting the following on it, but I will also give you visual clues. I HAVE seen this BIOS on a 9th gen Inspiron desktop, so I’m thinking Dell may have changed things in recent years and switched over to one BIOS skin.
Your BIOS may be different from my Dell, but this is how I have mine setup for USB boot after I reinstalled Windows 10. I would try setting the following on it, but I will also give you visual clues. I HAVE seen this BIOS on a 9th gen Inspiron desktop, so I’m thinking Dell may have changed things in recent years and switched over to one BIOS skin.
 
* USB Configuration: Enable Boot Support and External USB boot
* Boot sequence: Make sure UEFI is enabled and Windows Boot Manager is first. UEFI Hard Drive should be next.
 
Once you make those changes, press F12 and select the USB flash drive. At this point, you should not have an issue but you may need to temporarily disable Secure Boot. I personally leave it off (basically permanently), but it does have some security benefits for average users which justify re-enabling it.
 
[image|2305976]
 
[image|2305977]
 
[image|2305975]

Estatus:

open

Aporte original por: Nick ,

Texto:

Your BIOS may be different from my Dell, but this is how I have mine setup for USB boot after I reinstalled Windows 10. I would try setting the following on it, but I will also give you visual clues.

* USB Configuration: Enable Boot Support and External USB boot
* Boot sequence: Make sure UEFI is enabled and Windows Boot Manager is first. UEFI Hard Drive should be next.

Once you make those changes, press F12 and select the USB flash drive. At this point, you should not have an issue but you may need to temporarily disable Secure Boot. I personally leave it off (basically permanently), but it does have some security benefits for average users which justify re-enabling it.

[image|2305976]

[image|2305977]

[image|2305975]

Estatus:

open