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Versión actual por: jayeff ,

Texto:

Hi @willr ,
 
Defrost the ice off the evaporator unit by turning off the fridge, leaving the freezer door open and allowing the ice to melt naturally. You may need plenty of towels handy ;-). You can use a hair dryer on the coolest setting, but only for short periods and not for prolonged use. The evaporator is only made of thin aluminium and it may be damaged if it is exposed to the heat from a hair dryer etc, as it is designed to operate at below freezing temperatures.
 
An iced up evaporator unit can be caused by the following:
 
A faulty [https://www.searspartsdirect.com/product/2dagcll0qu-0046-464/id-61004307|defrost heater/defrost thermostat], [https://www.searspartsdirect.com/model/32smcyz8hy-003048/maytag-msd2554drw-side-by-side-refrigerator-parts|part #12 freezer diagram] You can measure the heater element using an Ohmmeter. Disconnect the power from the fridge and the disconnect the heater from the wiring harness and measure directly across the heater element wires. I don’t know what it is for your model but it should definitely not be open circuit. The ''defrost thermostat'' can also be faulty so if you measure OL Ohms or infinite resistance on the highest Ohms scale of the meter it may be the thermostat is faulty and not the heater element as they are in series connectionconnected. Looking at the wiring diagram, (see link in comment posted above) it shows that the test for the defrost thermostat should be 240K Ohms. maybe that is why they’re supplied as a unit. Looking at the image in the link above for the heater it does appear that they’re joined.
A faulty [https://www.searspartsdirect.com/product/2dagcll0qu-0046-464/id-61004307|defrost heater/defrost thermostat], [https://www.searspartsdirect.com/model/32smcyz8hy-003048/maytag-msd2554drw-side-by-side-refrigerator-parts|part #12 freezer diagram] You can measure the heater element using an Ohmmeter. Disconnect the power from the fridge and the disconnect the heater from the wiring harness and measure directly across the heater element wires. I don’t know what it is for your model but it should definitely not be open circuit. The ''defrost thermostat'' can also be faulty so if you measure OL Ohms or infinite resistance on the highest Ohms scale of the meter it may be the thermostat is faulty and not the heater element as they are in series connectionconnected. Looking at the wiring diagram, (see link in comment posted above) it shows that the test for the defrost thermostat should be 240K Ohms. maybe that is why they’re supplied as a unit. Looking at the image in the link above for the heater it does appear that they’re joined.
 
A ''blocked drain'' (parts #23 & #25 Compressor diagram). The drain goes from under the evaporator unit and leads to the evaporator pan under the compartments near the compressor so that the meltwater from the defrost action drains away to be evaporated. If the drain is blocked the water cannot escape and it refreezes after every defrost cycle and the ice subsequently builds up until eventually it covers the evaporator and the evap fan. This can cause the freezer to be warmer than it should be. Once the ice has been defrosted from the evap unit, pour a measured amount of water (cup?) down the drain in the freezer and check that it all gets to the evap pan.
 
A ''faulty'' [https://www.searspartsdirect.com/product/1i96qabgde-0046-464/id-68233-2|defrost timer], (part #13 Controls diagram). This initiates the defrost cycle. ''The defrost cycle occurs once every ~10 hours and lasts for about 20 minutes.'' When it starts ''the compressor and the evaporator fan are both turned off'' and the defrost heater is turned on to melt the ice build up on the evaporator unit. The temperature in the freezer is allowed to rise to aid in the melting of the ice. When the temperature is greater than the pre-set release temperature of the defrost thermostat, the thermostat releases turning the heater off and the compressor and evaporator fan are both turned on again to drive the temperatures back down again to the set temps. The defrost thermostat re-operates when the freezer temperature which is being driven down, has reached its pre-set operate temp (usually ~25F) so that the heater circuit is ready for the next defrost cycle 10 hours later. The defrost timer is also reset so that it begins to countdown to the next defrost cycle again.
 
The supplier I linked in this answer was only to show where the parts are located. There are other suppliers that may suit you better. Just search for ''MSD2554DRW parts.''
 
Sorry for the long answer, but I think that if you know how it should work, then it is easier to determine what is wrong when it doesn’t.

Estatus:

open

Editado por: jayeff ,

Texto:

Hi @willr ,
 
Defrost the ice off the evaporator unit by turning off the fridge, leaving the freezer door open and allowing the ice to melt naturally. You may need plenty of towels handy ;-). You can use a hair dryer on the coolest setting, but only for short periods and not for prolonged use. The evaporator is only made of thin aluminium and it may be damaged if it is exposed to the heat from a hair dryer etc, as it is designed to operate at below freezing temperatures.
 
An iced up evaporator unit can be caused by the following:
 
A faulty [https://www.searspartsdirect.com/product/2dagcll0qu-0046-464/id-61004307|defrost heater/defrost thermostat], [https://www.searspartsdirect.com/model/32smcyz8hy-003048/maytag-msd2554drw-side-by-side-refrigerator-parts|part #12 freezer diagram] You can measure the heater element using an Ohmmeter. Disconnect the power from the fridge and the disconnect the heater from the wiring harness and measure directly across the heater element wires. I don’t know what it is for your model but it should definitely not be open circuit. The ''defrost thermostat'' can also be faulty so if you measure OL Ohms or infinite resistance on the highest Ohms scale of the meter it may be the thermostat is faulty and not the heater element as they are in series connection. Looking at the wiring diagram, (see link in comment posted above) it shows that the test for the defrost thermostat should be 240K Ohms. maybe that is why they’re supplied as a unit. Looking at the image in the link above for the heater it does appear that they’re joined.
A faulty [https://www.searspartsdirect.com/product/2dagcll0qu-0046-464/id-61004307|defrost heater/defrost thermostat], [https://www.searspartsdirect.com/model/32smcyz8hy-003048/maytag-msd2554drw-side-by-side-refrigerator-parts|part #12 freezer diagram] You can measure the heater element using an Ohmmeter. Disconnect the power from the fridge and the disconnect the heater from the wiring harness and measure directly across the heater element wires. I don’t know what it is for your model but it should definitely not be open circuit. The ''defrost thermostat'' can also be faulty so if you measure OL Ohms or infinite resistance on the highest Ohms scale of the meter it may be the thermostat is faulty and not the heater element as they are in series connection. Looking at the wiring diagram, (see link in comment posted above) it shows that the test for the defrost thermostat should be 240K Ohms. maybe that is why they’re supplied as a unit. Looking at the image in the link above for the heater it does appear that they’re joined.
 
A ''blocked drain'' (parts #23 & #25 Compressor diagram). The drain goes from under the evaporator unit and leads to the evaporator pan under the compartments near the compressor so that the meltwater from the defrost action drains away to be evaporated. If the drain is blocked the water cannot escape and it refreezes after every defrost cycle and the ice subsequently builds up until eventually it covers the evaporator and the evap fan. This can cause the freezer to be warmer than it should be. Once the ice has been defrosted from the evap unit, pour a measured amount of water (cup?) down the drain in the freezer and check that it all gets to the evap pan.
 
A ''faulty'' [https://www.searspartsdirect.com/product/1i96qabgde-0046-464/id-68233-2|defrost timer], (part #13 Controls diagram). This initiates the defrost cycle. ''The defrost cycle occurs once every ~10 hours and lasts for about 20 minutes.'' When it starts ''the compressor and the evaporator fan are both turned off'' and the defrost heater is turned on to melt the ice build up on the evaporator unit. The temperature in the freezer is allowed to rise to aid in the melting of the ice. When the temperature is greater than the pre-set release temperature of the defrost thermostat, the thermostat releases turning the heater off and the compressor and evaporator fan are both turned on again to drive the temperatures back down again to the set temps. The defrost thermostat re-operates when the freezer temperature which is being driven down, has reached its pre-set operate temp (usually ~25F) so that the heater circuit is ready for the next defrost cycle 10 hours later. The defrost timer is also reset so that it begins to countdown to the next defrost cycle again.
 
The supplier I linked in this answer was only to show where the parts are located. There are other suppliers that may suit you better. Just search for ''MSD2554DRW parts.''
 
Sorry for the long answer, but I think that if you know how it should work, then it is easier to determine what is wrong when it doesn’t.

Estatus:

open

Editado por: jayeff ,

Texto:

Hi @willr ,
 
Defrost the ice off the evaporator unit by turning off the fridge, leaving the freezer door open and allowing the ice to melt naturally. You may need plenty of towels handy ;-). You can use a hair dryer on the coolest setting, but only for short periods and not for prolonged use. The evaporator is only made of thin aluminium and it may be damaged if it is exposed to the heat from a hair dryer etc, as it is designed to operate at below freezing temperatures.
 
An iced up evaporator unit can be caused by the following in no particular order of likelyhoodfollowing:
An iced up evaporator unit can be caused by the following in no particular order of likelyhoodfollowing:
 
A faulty [https://www.searspartsdirect.com/product/2dagcll0qu-0046-464/id-61004307|defrost heater/defrost thermostat], [https://www.searspartsdirect.com/model/32smcyz8hy-003048/maytag-msd2554drw-side-by-side-refrigerator-parts|part #12 freezer diagram] You can measure the heater element using an Ohmmeter. Disconnect the power from the fridge and the disconnect the heater from the wiring harness and measure directly across the heater element wires. I don’t know what it is for your model but it should definitely not be open circuit. The ''defrost thermostat'' can also be faulty so if you measure OL Ohms or infinite resistance on the highest Ohms scale of the meter it may be the thermostat is faulty and not the heater element as they are in series connection. Looking at the wiring diagram, (see link in comment above) it shows that the test for the defrost thermostat should be 240K Ohms. maybe that is why they’re supplied as a unit. Looking at the image in the link above for the heater it does appear that they’re joined.
 
A ''blocked drain'' (parts #23 & #25 Compressor diagram). The drain goes from under the evaporator unit and leads to the evaporator pan under the compartments near the compressor so that the meltwater from the defrost action drains away to be evaporated. If the drain is blocked the water cannot escape and it refreezes after every defrost cycle and the ice subsequently builds up until eventually it covers the evaporator and the evap fan. This can cause the freezer to be warmer than it should be. Once the ice has been defrosted from the evap unit, pour a measured amount of water (cup?) down the drain in the freezer and check that it all gets to the evap pan.
 
A ''faulty'' [https://www.searspartsdirect.com/product/1i96qabgde-0046-464/id-68233-2|defrost timer], (part #13 Controls diagram). This initiates the defrost cycle. ''The defrost cycle occurs once every ~10 hours and lasts for about 20 minutes.'' When it starts ''the compressor and the evaporator fan are both turned off'' and the defrost heater is turned on to melt the ice build up on the evaporator unit. The temperature in the freezer is allowed to rise to aid in the melting of the ice. When the temperature is greater than the pre-set release temperature of the defrost thermostat, the thermostat releases turning the heater off and the compressor and evaporator fan are both turned on again to drive the temperatures back down again to the set temps. The defrost thermostat re-operates when the freezer temperature which is being driven down, has reached its pre-set operate temp (usually ~25F) so that the heater circuit is ready for the next defrost cycle 10 hours later. The defrost timer is also reset so that it begins to countdown to the next defrost cycle again.
 
The supplier I linked in this answer was only to show where the parts are located. There are other suppliers that may suit you better. Just search for ''MSD2554DRW parts.''
 
Sorry for the long answer, but I think that if you know how it should work, then it is easier to determine what is wrong when it doesn’t.

Estatus:

open

Editado por: jayeff ,

Texto:

Hi @willr ,
 
Defrost the ice ofoff the evaporator unit by turning off the fridge, leaving the freezer door open and allowing the ice to melt naturally. You may need plenty of towels handy ;-). You can use a hair dryer on the coolest setting, but only for short periods and not for prolonged use. The evaporator is only made of thin aluminium and it may be damaged if it is exposed to the heat from a hair dryer etc, as it is designed to operate at below freezing temperatures.
Defrost the ice ofoff the evaporator unit by turning off the fridge, leaving the freezer door open and allowing the ice to melt naturally. You may need plenty of towels handy ;-). You can use a hair dryer on the coolest setting, but only for short periods and not for prolonged use. The evaporator is only made of thin aluminium and it may be damaged if it is exposed to the heat from a hair dryer etc, as it is designed to operate at below freezing temperatures.
 
An iced up evaporator unit can be caused by the following in no particular order of likelyhood:
 
A faulty [https://www.searspartsdirect.com/product/2dagcll0qu-0046-464/id-61004307|defrost heater/defrost thermostat], [https://www.searspartsdirect.com/model/32smcyz8hy-003048/maytag-msd2554drw-side-by-side-refrigerator-parts|part #12 freezer diagram] You can measure the heater element using an Ohmmeter. Disconnect the power from the fridge and the disconnect the heater from the wiring harness and measure directly across the heater element wires. I don’t know what it is for your model but it should definitely not be open circuit. The ''defrost thermostat'' can also be faulty so if you measure OL Ohms or infinite resistance on the highest Ohms scale of the meter it may be the thermostat is faulty and not the heater element as they are in series connection. Looking at the wiring diagram, (see link in comment above) it shows that the test for the defrost thermostat should be 240K Ohms. maybe that is why they’re supplied as a unit. Looking at the image in the link above for the heater it does appear that they’re joined.
 
A ''blocked drain'' (parts #23 & #25 Compressor diagram). The drain goes from under the evaporator unit and leads to the evaporator pan under the compartments near the compressor so that the meltwater from the defrost action drains away to be evaporated. If the drain is blocked the water cannot escape and it refreezes after every defrost cycle and the ice subsequently builds up until eventually it covers the evaporator and the evap fan. This can cause the freezer to be warmer than it should be. Once the ice has been defrosted from the evap unit, pour a measured amount of water (cup?) down the drain in the freezer and check that it all gets to the evap pan.
 
A ''faulty'' [https://www.searspartsdirect.com/product/1i96qabgde-0046-464/id-68233-2|defrost timer], (part #13 Controls diagram). This initiates the defrost cycle. ''The defrost cycle occurs once every ~10 hours and lasts for about 20 minutes.'' When it starts ''the compressor and the evaporator fan are both turned off'' and the defrost heater is turned on to melt the ice build up on the evaporator unit. The temperature in the freezer is allowed to rise to aid in the melting of the ice. When the temperature is greater than the pre-set release temperature of the defrost thermostat, the thermostat releases turning the heater off and the compressor and evaporator fan are both turned on again to drive the temperatures back down again to the set temps. The defrost thermostat re-operates when the freezer temperature which is being driven down, has reached its pre-set operate temp (usually ~25F) so that the heater circuit is ready for the next defrost cycle 10 hours later. The defrost timer is also reset so that it begins to countdown to the next defrost cycle again.
 
The supplier I linked in this answer was only to show where the parts are located. There are other suppliers that may suit you better. Just search for ''MSD2554DRW parts.''
 
Sorry for the long answer, but I think that if you know how it should work, then it is easier to determine what is wrong when it doesn’t.

Estatus:

open

Editado por: jayeff ,

Texto:

Hi @willr ,
 
Defrost the ice of the evaporator unit by turning off the fridgefridge, leaving the freezer door open and allowallowing the ice to melt naturally. You may need plenty of towels handy ;-). You can use a hair dryer on the coolest setting, but only for short periods and not for prolonged use. The evaporator is only made of thin aluminium and it may be damaged if it is exposed to the heat from a hair dryer etc, as it is designed to operate at below freezing temperatures.
Defrost the ice of the evaporator unit by turning off the fridgefridge, leaving the freezer door open and allowallowing the ice to melt naturally. You may need plenty of towels handy ;-). You can use a hair dryer on the coolest setting, but only for short periods and not for prolonged use. The evaporator is only made of thin aluminium and it may be damaged if it is exposed to the heat from a hair dryer etc, as it is designed to operate at below freezing temperatures.
 
An iced up evaporator unit can be caused by the following in no particular order of likelyhood:
 
A faulty [https://www.searspartsdirect.com/product/2dagcll0qu-0046-464/id-61004307|defrost heater/defrost thermostat], [https://www.searspartsdirect.com/model/32smcyz8hy-003048/maytag-msd2554drw-side-by-side-refrigerator-parts|part #12 freezer diagram] You can measure the heater element using an Ohmmeter. Disconnect the power from the fridge and the disconnect the heater from the wiring harness and measure directly across the heater element wires. I don’t know what it is for your model but it should definitely not be open circuit. The ''defrost thermostat'' can also be faulty so if you measure OL Ohms or infinite resistance on the highest Ohms scale of the meter it may be the thermostat is faulty and not the heater element as they are in series connection. Looking at the wiring diagram, (see link in comment above) it shows that the test for the defrost thermostat should be 240K Ohms. maybe that is why they’re supplied as a unit. Looking at the image in the link above for the heater it does appear that they’re joined.
 
A ''blocked drain'' (parts #23 & #25 Compressor diagram). The drain goes from under the evaporator unit and leads to the evaporator pan under the compartments near the compressor so that the meltwater from the defrost action drains away to be evaporated. If the drain is blocked the water cannot escape and it refreezes after every defrost cycle and the ice subsequently builds up until eventually it covers the evaporator and the evap fan. This can cause the freezer to be warmer than it should be. Once the ice has been defrosted from the evap unit, pour a measured amount of water (cup?) down the drain in the freezer and check that it all gets to the evap pan.
 
A ''faulty'' [https://www.searspartsdirect.com/product/1i96qabgde-0046-464/id-68233-2|defrost timer], (part #13 Controls diagram). This initiates the defrost cycle. ''The defrost cycle occurs once every ~10 hours and lasts for about 20 minutes.'' When it starts ''the compressor and the evaporator fan are both turned off'' and the defrost heater is turned on to melt the ice build up on the evaporator unit. The temperature in the freezer is allowed to rise to aid in the melting of the ice. When the temperature is greater than the pre-set release temperature of the defrost thermostat, the thermostat releases turning the heater off and the compressor and evaporator fan are both turned on again to drive the temperatures back down again to the set temps. The defrost thermostat re-operates when the freezer temperature which is being driven down, has reached its pre-set operate temp (usually ~25F) so that the heater circuit is ready for the next defrost cycle 10 hours later. The defrost timer is also reset so that it begins to countdown to the next defrost cycle again.
 
The supplier I linked in this answer was only to show where the parts are located. There are other suppliers that may suit you better. Just search for ''MSD2554DRW parts.''
 
Sorry for the long answer, but I think that if you know how it should work, then it is easier to determine what is wrong when it doesn’t.

Estatus:

open

Editado por: jayeff ,

Texto:

Hi @willr ,
 
Defrost the ice of the evaporator unit by turning off the fridge and allow the ice to melt naturally. You may need plenty of towels handy ;-). You can use a hair dryer on the coolest setting, but only for short periods and not for prolonged use. The evaporator is only made of thin aluminium and it may be damaged if it is exposed to the heat from a hair dryer etc, as it is designed to operate at below freezing temperatures.
 
An iced up evaporator unit can be caused by the following in no particular order of likelyhood:
 
A faulty [https://www.searspartsdirect.com/product/2dagcll0qu-0046-464/id-61004307|defrost heater/defrost thermostat], [https://www.searspartsdirect.com/model/32smcyz8hy-003048/maytag-msd2554drw-side-by-side-refrigerator-parts|part #12 freezer diagram] You can measure the heater element using an Ohmmeter. Disconnect the power from the fridge and the disconnect the heater from the wiring harness and measure directly across the heater element wires. I don’t know what it is for your model but it should definitely not be open circuit. The ''defrost thermostat'' can also be faulty so if you measure OL Ohms or infinite resistance on the highest Ohms scale of the meter it may be the thermostat is faulty and not the heater element as they are in series connection. Looking at the wiring diagram, (see link in comment above) it shows that the test for the defrost thermostat should be 240K Ohms. maybe that is why they’re supplied as a unit. Looking at the image in the link above for the heater it does appear that they’re joined.
 
A ''blocked drain'' (parts #23 & #25 Compressor diagram). The drain goes from under the evaporator unit and leads to the evaporator pan under the compartments near the compressor so that the meltwater from the defrost action drains away to be evaporated. If the drain is blocked the water cannot escape and it refreezes after every defrost cycle and the ice subsequently builds up until eventually it covers the evaporator and the evap fan. This can cause the freezer to be warmer than it should be. Once the ice has been defrosted from the evap unit, pour a measured amount of water (cup?) down the drain in the freezer and check that it all gets to the evap pan.
 
A ''faulty'' [https://www.searspartsdirect.com/product/1i96qabgde-0046-464/id-68233-2|defrost timer], (part #13 Controls diagram). This initiates the defrost cycle. The''The defrost cycle occurs once every ~10 hours and lasts for about 20 minutes.minutes.'' When it starts the''the compressor and the evaporator fan are both turned offoff'' and the defrost heater is turned on to melt the ice build up on the evaporator unit. The temperature in the freezer is allowed to rise to aid in the melting of the ice. When the temperature is greater than the pre-set release temperature of the defrost thermostat, the thermostat releases turning the heater off and the compressor and evaporator fan are both turned on again to drive the temperatures back down again to the set temps. The defrost thermostat re-operates when the freezer temperature which is being driven down, has reached its pre-set operate temp (usually ~25F) so that the heater circuit is ready for the next defrost cycle 10 hours later. The defrost timer is also reset so that it begins to countdown to the next defrost cycle again.
A ''faulty'' [https://www.searspartsdirect.com/product/1i96qabgde-0046-464/id-68233-2|defrost timer], (part #13 Controls diagram). This initiates the defrost cycle. The''The defrost cycle occurs once every ~10 hours and lasts for about 20 minutes.minutes.'' When it starts the''the compressor and the evaporator fan are both turned offoff'' and the defrost heater is turned on to melt the ice build up on the evaporator unit. The temperature in the freezer is allowed to rise to aid in the melting of the ice. When the temperature is greater than the pre-set release temperature of the defrost thermostat, the thermostat releases turning the heater off and the compressor and evaporator fan are both turned on again to drive the temperatures back down again to the set temps. The defrost thermostat re-operates when the freezer temperature which is being driven down, has reached its pre-set operate temp (usually ~25F) so that the heater circuit is ready for the next defrost cycle 10 hours later. The defrost timer is also reset so that it begins to countdown to the next defrost cycle again.
 
The supplier I linked in this answer was only to show where the parts are located. There are other suppliers that may suit you better. Just search for ''MSD2554DRW parts.''
 
Sorry for the long answer, but I think that if you know how it should work, then it is easier to determine what is wrong when it doesn’t.

Estatus:

open

Editado por: jayeff ,

Texto:

Hi @willr ,
 
Defrost the ice of the evaporator unit by turning off the fridge and allow the ice to melt naturally. You may need plenty of towels handy ;-). You can use a hair dryer on the coolest setting, but only for short periods and not for prolonged use. The evaporator is only made of thin aluminium and it may be damaged if it is exposed to the heat from a hair dryer etc, as it is designed to operate at below freezing temperatures.
 
An iced up evaporator unit can be caused by the followingfollowing in no particular order of likelyhood:
An iced up evaporator unit can be caused by the followingfollowing in no particular order of likelyhood:
 
A faulty [https://www.searspartsdirect.com/product/2dagcll0qu-0046-464/id-61004307|defrost heater/defrost thermostat], [https://www.searspartsdirect.com/model/32smcyz8hy-003048/maytag-msd2554drw-side-by-side-refrigerator-parts|part #12 freezer diagram] You can measure the heater element using an Ohmmeter. Disconnect the power from the fridge and the disconnect the heater from the wiring harness and measure directly across the heater element wires. I don’t know what it is for your model but it should definitely not be open circuit. The ''defrost thermostat'' can also be faulty so if you measure OL Ohms or infinite resistance on the highest Ohms scale of the meter it may be the thermostat is faulty and not the heater element as they are in series connection. Looking at the wiring diagram, (see link in comment above) it shows that the test for the defrost thermostat should be 240K Ohms. maybe that is why they’re supplied as a unit. Looking at the image in the link above for the heater it does appear that they’re joined.
 
A ''blocked drain'' (parts #23 & #25 Compressor diagram). The drain goes from under the evaporator unit and leads to the evaporator pan under the compartments near the compressor so that the meltwater from the defrost action drains away to be evaporated. If the drain is blocked the water cannot escape and it refreezes after every defrost cycle and the ice subsequently builds up until eventually it covers the evaporator and the evap fan. This can cause the freezer to be warmer than it should be. Once the ice has been defrosted from the evap unit, pour a measured amount of water (cup?) down the drain in the freezer and check that it all gets to the evap pan.
 
A ''faulty'' [https://www.searspartsdirect.com/product/1i96qabgde-0046-464/id-68233-2|defrost timer], (part #13 Controls diagram). This initiates the defrost cycle. The defrost cycle occurs once every ~10 hours and lasts for about 20 minutes. When it starts the compressor and evaporator fan are both turned off and the defrost heater is turned on to melt the ice build up on the evaporator unit. The temperature in the freezer is allowed to rise to aid in the melting of the ice. When the temperature is greater than the pre-set release temperature of the defrost thermostat, the thermostat releases turning the heater off and the compressor and evaporator fan are both turned on again to drive the temperatures back down again to the set temps. The defrost thermostat re-operates when the freezer temperature which is being driven down, has reached its pre-set operate temp (usually ~25F) so that the heater circuit is ready for the next defrost cycle 10 hours later. The defrost timer is also reset so that it begins to countdown to the next defrost cycle again.
 
The supplier I linked in this answer was only to show where the parts are located. There are other suppliers that may suit you better. Just search for ''MSD2554DRW parts.''
 
Sorry for the long answer, but I think that if you know how it should work, then it is easier to determine what is wrong when it doesn’t.

Estatus:

open

Editado por: jayeff ,

Texto:

Hi @willr ,
 
Defrost the ice of the evaporator unit by turning off the fridge and allow the ice to melt naturally. You may need plenty of towels handy ;-). You can use a hair dryer on the coolest setting, but only for short periods and not for prolonged use. The evaporator is only made of thin aluminium and it may be damaged if it is exposed to the heat from a hair dryer etc, as it is designed to operate at below freezing temperatures.
Defrost the ice of the evaporator unit by turning off the fridge and allow the ice to melt naturally. You may need plenty of towels handy ;-). You can use a hair dryer on the coolest setting, but only for short periods and not for prolonged use. The evaporator is only made of thin aluminium and it may be damaged if it is exposed to the heat from a hair dryer etc, as it is designed to operate at below freezing temperatures.
 
An iced up evaporator unit can be caused by the following:
 
A faulty [https://www.searspartsdirect.com/product/2dagcll0qu-0046-464/id-61004307|defrost heater/defrost thermostat], [https://www.searspartsdirect.com/model/32smcyz8hy-003048/maytag-msd2554drw-side-by-side-refrigerator-parts|part #12 freezer diagram] You can measure the heater element using an Ohmmeter. Disconnect the power from the fridge and the disconnect the heater from the wiring harness and measure directly across the heater element wires. I don’t know what it is for your model but it should definitely not be open circuit. The ''defrost thermostat'' can also be faulty so if you measure OL Ohms or infinite resistance on the highest Ohms scale of the meter it may be the thermostat is faulty and not the heater element as they are in series connection. Looking at the wiring diagram, (see link in comment above) it shows that the test for the defrost thermostat should be 240K Ohms. maybe that is why they’re supplied as a unit. Looking at the image in the link above for the heater it does appear that they’re joined.
 
A ''blocked drain'' (parts #23 & #25 Compressor diagram). The drain goes from under the evaporator unit and leads to the evaporator pan under the compartments near the compressor so that the meltwater from the defrost action drains away to be evaporated. If the drain is blocked the water cannot escape and it refreezes after every defrost cycle and the ice subsequently builds up until eventually it covers the evaporator and the evap fan. This can cause the freezer to be warmer than it should be. Once the ice has been defrosted from the evap unit, pour a measured amount of water (cup?) down the drain in the freezer and check that it all gets to the evap pan.
A ''blocked drain'' (parts #23 & #25 Compressor diagram). The drain goes from under the evaporator unit and leads to the evaporator pan under the compartments near the compressor so that the meltwater from the defrost action drains away to be evaporated. If the drain is blocked the water cannot escape and it refreezes after every defrost cycle and the ice subsequently builds up until eventually it covers the evaporator and the evap fan. This can cause the freezer to be warmer than it should be. Once the ice has been defrosted from the evap unit, pour a measured amount of water (cup?) down the drain in the freezer and check that it all gets to the evap pan.
 
A ''faulty'' [https://www.searspartsdirect.com/product/1i96qabgde-0046-464/id-68233-2|defrost timer], (part #13 Controls diagram). This initiates the defrost cycle. The defrost cycle occurs once every ~10 hours and lasts for about 20 minutes. When it starts the compressor and evaporator fan are both turned off and the defrost heater is turned on to melt the ice build up on the evaporator unit. The temperature in the freezer is allowed to rise to aid in the melting of the ice. When the temperature is greater than the pre-set release temperature of the defrost thermostat (>32 F),thermostat, the thermostat releases turning the heater is turned off and the compressor and evaporator fan are both turned on again to drive the temperaturetemperatures back down again to the set temps. The defrost thermostat re-operates when the freezer temperature which is being driven down, has reached its pre-set operate temp (<25F) to beusually ~25F) so that the heater circuit is ready for the next defrost cycle 10 hours later. The defrost timer is also reset so that it begins to countdown to the next defrost cycle again.
A ''faulty'' [https://www.searspartsdirect.com/product/1i96qabgde-0046-464/id-68233-2|defrost timer], (part #13 Controls diagram). This initiates the defrost cycle. The defrost cycle occurs once every ~10 hours and lasts for about 20 minutes. When it starts the compressor and evaporator fan are both turned off and the defrost heater is turned on to melt the ice build up on the evaporator unit. The temperature in the freezer is allowed to rise to aid in the melting of the ice. When the temperature is greater than the pre-set release temperature of the defrost thermostat (>32 F),thermostat, the thermostat releases turning the heater is turned off and the compressor and evaporator fan are both turned on again to drive the temperaturetemperatures back down again to the set temps. The defrost thermostat re-operates when the freezer temperature which is being driven down, has reached its pre-set operate temp (<25F) to beusually ~25F) so that the heater circuit is ready for the next defrost cycle 10 hours later. The defrost timer is also reset so that it begins to countdown to the next defrost cycle again.
 
The supplier I linked in this answer was only to show where the parts are located. There are other suppliers that may suit you better. Just search for ''MSD2554DRW parts''parts.''

Sorry for the long answer, but I think that if you know how it should work, then it is easier to determine what is wrong when it doesn’t.
The supplier I linked in this answer was only to show where the parts are located. There are other suppliers that may suit you better. Just search for ''MSD2554DRW parts''parts.''

Sorry for the long answer, but I think that if you know how it should work, then it is easier to determine what is wrong when it doesn’t.

Estatus:

open

Editado por: jayeff ,

Texto:

Hi @willr ,
 
Defrost the ice of the evaporator unit by turning off the fridge and allow the ice to melt naturally. You can use a hair dryer on the coolest setting, but only for short periods and not for prolonged use. The evaporator is only made of thin aluminium and it may be damaged if it is exposed to the heat from a hair dryer etc, as it is designed to operate at below freezing temperatures.
 
An iced up evaporator unit can be caused by the following:
 
A faulty [https://www.searspartsdirect.com/product/2dagcll0qu-0046-464/id-61004307|defrost heater/defrost thermostat], [https://www.searspartsdirect.com/model/32smcyz8hy-003048/maytag-msd2554drw-side-by-side-refrigerator-parts|part #12 freezer diagram] You can measure the heater element using an Ohmmeter. Disconnect the power from the fridge and the disconnect the heater from the wiring harness and measure directly across the heater element wires. I don’t know what it is for your model but it should definitely not be open circuit. The ''defrost thermostat'' can also be faulty so if you measure OL Ohms or infinite resistance on the highest Ohms scale of the meter it may be the thermostat is faulty and not the heater element as they are in series connection. Looking at the wiring diagram, (see link in comment above) it shows that the test for the defrost thermostat should be 240K Ohms. maybe that is why they’re supplied as a unit. Looking at the image in the link above for the heater it does appear that they’re joined.
 
A ''blocked drain'' (parts #23 & #25 Compressor diagram). The drain goes from under the evaporator unit and leads to the evaporator pan under the compartments near the compressor so that the meltwater from the defrost action drains away to be evaporated. If the drain is blocked the water cannot escape and it refreezes after every defrost cycle and the ice subsequently builds up until eventually it covers the evaporator and the evap fan. This can cause the freezer to be warmer than it should be. Once the ice has been defrosted from the evap unit, pour a measured amount of water down the drain in the freezer and check that it all gets to the evap pan.
 
A ''faulty'' [https://www.searspartsdirect.com/product/1i96qabgde-0046-464/id-68233-2|defrost timer], (part #13 Controls diagram). This startsinitiates the defrost cycle. The defrost cycle occurs once every ~10 hours and lasts for about 20 minutes. When it starts the compressor and evaporator fan are both turned off and the defrost heater is turned on to melt the ice build up on the evaporator unit. The temperature in the freezer is allowed to rise to aid in the melting of the ice. When the temperature is greater than the setpre-set release temperature of the defrost thermostat (>32 F), the heater is turned off and the compressor and evaporator fan are both turned on again to drive the temperature back down again to the set temps. The defrost thermostat re-operates when the temperature has reached its setpre-set operate temp (<25F) to be ready for the next defrost cycle 10 hours later. The defrost timer is also reset so asthat it begins to countdown to the next defrost cyclecycle again.
A ''faulty'' [https://www.searspartsdirect.com/product/1i96qabgde-0046-464/id-68233-2|defrost timer], (part #13 Controls diagram). This startsinitiates the defrost cycle. The defrost cycle occurs once every ~10 hours and lasts for about 20 minutes. When it starts the compressor and evaporator fan are both turned off and the defrost heater is turned on to melt the ice build up on the evaporator unit. The temperature in the freezer is allowed to rise to aid in the melting of the ice. When the temperature is greater than the setpre-set release temperature of the defrost thermostat (>32 F), the heater is turned off and the compressor and evaporator fan are both turned on again to drive the temperature back down again to the set temps. The defrost thermostat re-operates when the temperature has reached its setpre-set operate temp (<25F) to be ready for the next defrost cycle 10 hours later. The defrost timer is also reset so asthat it begins to countdown to the next defrost cyclecycle again.
 
The supplier I linked in this answer was only to show where the parts are located. There are other suppliers that may suit you better. Just search for ''MSD2554DRW parts''

Estatus:

open

Editado por: jayeff ,

Texto:

Hi @willr ,
 
Defrost the ice of the evaporator unit by turning off the fridge and allow the ice to melt naturally. You can use a hair dryer on the coolest setting, but only for short periods and not for prolonged use. The evaporator is only made of thin aluminium and it may be damaged if it is exposed to the heat from a hair dryer etc, as it is designed to operate at below freezing temperatures.
 
An iced up evaporator unit can be caused by the following:
 
A faulty [https://www.searspartsdirect.com/product/2dagcll0qu-0046-464/id-61004307|defrost heaterheater/defrost thermostat], [https://www.searspartsdirect.com/model/32smcyz8hy-003048/maytag-msd2554drw-side-by-side-refrigerator-parts|part #12 freezer diagram] You can measure the heater element using an Ohmmeter. Disconnect the power from the fridge and the disconnect the heater from the wiring harness and measure directly across the heater element wires. I don’t know what it is for your model but it should be between 25-100 Ohms and definitely not be open circuit. The ''defrost thermostat'' can also be faulty so if you measure OL Ohms or infinite resistance on the highest Ohms scale of the meter it may be the thermostat is faulty and not the heater element as they are in series connection I thinkconnection. Looking at the wiring diagram, (see link in comment above) it shows that the test for the defrost thermostat should be 240K Ohms. maybe that is why they’re supplied as a unit. Looking at the image in the link above for the heater it does appear that they’re joined.
A faulty [https://www.searspartsdirect.com/product/2dagcll0qu-0046-464/id-61004307|defrost heaterheater/defrost thermostat], [https://www.searspartsdirect.com/model/32smcyz8hy-003048/maytag-msd2554drw-side-by-side-refrigerator-parts|part #12 freezer diagram] You can measure the heater element using an Ohmmeter. Disconnect the power from the fridge and the disconnect the heater from the wiring harness and measure directly across the heater element wires. I don’t know what it is for your model but it should be between 25-100 Ohms and definitely not be open circuit. The ''defrost thermostat'' can also be faulty so if you measure OL Ohms or infinite resistance on the highest Ohms scale of the meter it may be the thermostat is faulty and not the heater element as they are in series connection I thinkconnection. Looking at the wiring diagram, (see link in comment above) it shows that the test for the defrost thermostat should be 240K Ohms. maybe that is why they’re supplied as a unit. Looking at the image in the link above for the heater it does appear that they’re joined.
 
A ''blocked drain'' (parts #23 & #25 Compressor diagram). The drain goes from under the evaporator unit and leads to the evaporator pan under the compartments near the compressor so that the meltwater from the defrost action drains away to be evaporated. If the drain is blocked the water cannot escape and it refreezes after every defrost cycle and the ice subsequently builds up until eventually it covers the evaporator and the evap fan. This can cause the freezer to be warmer than it should be. Once the ice has been defrosted from the evap unit, pour a measured amount of water down the drain in the freezer and check that it all gets to the evap pan.
 
A ''faulty'' [https://www.searspartsdirect.com/product/1i96qabgde-0046-464/id-68233-2|defrost timer], (part #13 Controls diagram). This starts the defrost cycle. The defrost cycle occurs once every ~10 hours and lasts for about 20 minutes. When it starts the compressor and evaporator fan are both turned off and the defrost heater is turned on to melt the ice build up on the evaporator unit. The temperature in the freezer is allowed to rise to aid in the melting of the ice. When the temperature is greater than the set release temperature of the defrost thermostat (>32 F), the heater is turned off and the compressor and evaporator fan are both turned on again to drive the temperature back down again to the set temps. The defrost thermostat re-operates when the temperature has reached its set operate temp (<25F) to be ready for the next defrost cycle 10 hours later. The defrost timer is also reset so as to countdown to the next defrost cycle.
 
The supplier I linked in this answer was only to show where the parts are located. There are other suppliers that may suit you better. Just search for ''MSD2554DRW parts''

Estatus:

open

Editado por: jayeff ,

Texto:

Hi @willr ,
 
Defrost the ice of the evaporator unit by turning off the fridge and allow the ice to melt naturally. You can use a hair dryer on the coolest setting, but only for short periods and not for prolonged use. The evaporator is only made of thin aluminium and it may be damaged if it is exposed to the heat from a hair dryer etc, as it is designed to operate at below freezing temperatures.
 
An iced up evaporator unit can be caused by the following:
 
A faulty [https://www.searspartsdirect.com/product/2dagcll0qu-0046-464/id-61004307|defrost heater], [https://www.searspartsdirect.com/model/32smcyz8hy-003048/maytag-msd2554drw-side-by-side-refrigerator-parts|part #12 freezer diagram] You can measure the heater element using an Ohmmeter. Disconnect the power from the fridge and the disconnect the heater from the wiring harness and measure directly across the heater element wires. I don’t know what it is for your model but it should be between 25-100 Ohms and definitely not open circuit. The ''defrost thermostat'' can also be faulty so if you measure OL Ohms it may be the thermostat is faulty and not the heater element as they are in series connection I think
A faulty [https://www.searspartsdirect.com/product/2dagcll0qu-0046-464/id-61004307|defrost heater], [https://www.searspartsdirect.com/model/32smcyz8hy-003048/maytag-msd2554drw-side-by-side-refrigerator-parts|part #12 freezer diagram] You can measure the heater element using an Ohmmeter. Disconnect the power from the fridge and the disconnect the heater from the wiring harness and measure directly across the heater element wires. I don’t know what it is for your model but it should be between 25-100 Ohms and definitely not open circuit. The ''defrost thermostat'' can also be faulty so if you measure OL Ohms it may be the thermostat is faulty and not the heater element as they are in series connection I think
 
A ''blocked drain'' (parts #23 & #25 Compressor diagram). The drain goes from under the evaporator unit and leads to the evaporator pan under the compartments near the compressor so that the meltwater from the defrost action drains away to be evaporated. If the drain is blocked the water cannot escape and it refreezes after every defrost cycle and the ice subsequently builds up until eventually it covers the evaporator and the evap fan. This can cause the freezer to be warmer than it should be. Once the ice has been defrosted from the evap unit, pour a measured amount of water down the drain in the freezer and check that it all gets to the evap pan.
 
A ''faulty'' [https://www.searspartsdirect.com/product/1i96qabgde-0046-464/id-68233-2|defrost timer], (part #13 Controls diagram). This starts the defrost cycle. The defrost cycle occurs once every ~10 hours and lasts for about 20 minutes. When it starts the compressor and evaporator fan are both turned off and the defrost heater is turned on to melt the ice build up on the evaporator unit. The temperature in the freezer is allowed to rise to aid in the melting of the ice. When the temperature is greater than the set release temperature of the defrost thermostat (>32 F), the heater is turned off and the compressor and evaporator fan are both turned on again to drive the temperature back down again to the set temps. The defrost thermostat re-operates when the temperature has reached its set operate temp (<25F) to be ready for the next defrost cycle 10 hours later. The defrost timer is also reset so as to countdown to the next defrost cycle.
 
The supplier I linked in this answer was only to show where the parts are located. There are other suppliers that may suit you better. Just search for ''MSD2554DRW parts''

Estatus:

open

Editado por: jayeff ,

Texto:

Hi @willr ,
 
Defrost the ice of the evaporator unit by turning off the fridge and allow the ice to melt naturally. You can use a hair dryer on the coolest setting, but only for short periods and not for prolonged use. The evaporator is only made of thin aluminium and it may be damaged if it is exposed to the heat from a hair dryer etc, as it is designed to operate at below freezing temperatures.
 
An iced up evaporator unit can be caused by the following:
 
A faulty [https://www.searspartsdirect.com/product/2dagcll0qu-0046-464/id-61004307|defrost heater], [https://www.searspartsdirect.com/model/32smcyz8hy-003048/maytag-msd2554drw-side-by-side-refrigerator-parts|part #12 freezer diagram] You can measure the heater element using an Ohmmeter. Disconnect the power from the fridge and the disconnect the heater from the wiring harness and measure directly across the heater element wires. I don’t know what it is for your model but it should be <100between 25-100 Ohms and definitely not open circuit.
A faulty [https://www.searspartsdirect.com/product/2dagcll0qu-0046-464/id-61004307|defrost heater], [https://www.searspartsdirect.com/model/32smcyz8hy-003048/maytag-msd2554drw-side-by-side-refrigerator-parts|part #12 freezer diagram] You can measure the heater element using an Ohmmeter. Disconnect the power from the fridge and the disconnect the heater from the wiring harness and measure directly across the heater element wires. I don’t know what it is for your model but it should be <100between 25-100 Ohms and definitely not open circuit.
 
A ''blocked drain'' (parts #23 & #25 Compressor diagram). The drain goes from under the evaporator unit and leads to the evaporator pan under the compartments near the compressor so that the meltwater from the defrost action drains away to be evaporated. If the drain is blocked the water cannot escape and it refreezes after every defrost cycle and the ice subsequently builds up until eventually it covers the evaporator and the evap fan. This can cause the freezer to be warmer than it should be. Once the ice has been defrosted from the evap unit, pour a measured amount of water down the drain in the freezer and check that it all gets to the evap pan.
 
A ''faulty'' [https://www.searspartsdirect.com/product/1i96qabgde-0046-464/id-68233-2|defrost timer], (part #13 Controls diagram). This starts the defrost cycle. The defrost cycle occurs once every ~10 hours and lasts for about 20 minutes. When it starts the compressor and evaporator fan are both turned off and the defrost heater is turned on to melt the ice build up on the evaporator unit. The temperature in the freezer is allowed to rise to aid in the melting of the ice. When the temperature is greater than the set release temperature of the defrost thermostat (>32 F), the heater is turned off and the compressor and evaporator fan are both turned on again to drive the temperature back down again to the set temps. The defrost thermostat re-operates when the temperature has reached its set operate temp (<25F) to be ready for the next defrost cycle 10 hours later. The defrost timer is also reset so as to countdown to the next defrost cycle.
 
The supplier I linked in this answer was only to show where the parts are located. There are other suppliers that may suit you better. Just search for ''MSD2554DRW parts''

Estatus:

open

Editado por: jayeff ,

Texto:

Hi @willr ,
 
Defrost the ice of the evaporator unit by turning off the fridge and allow the ice to melt naturally. You can use a hair dryer on the coolest setting, but only for short periods and not for prolonged use. The evaporator is only made of thin aluminium and it may be damaged if it is exposed to the heat from a hair dryer etc, as it is designed to operate at below freezing temperatures.
 
An iced up evaporator unit can be caused by the following:
 
A faulty [https://www.searspartsdirect.com/product/2dagcll0qu-0046-464/id-61004307|defrost heater], [https://www.searspartsdirect.com/model/32smcyz8hy-003048/maytag-msd2554drw-side-by-side-refrigerator-parts|part #12 freezer diagram] You can measure the heater element using an Ohmmeter. Disconnect the power from the fridge and the disconnect the heater from the wiring harness and measure directly across the heater elementelement wires. I don’t know what it is for your model but it should be <100 Ohms and definitely not open circuit.
A faulty [https://www.searspartsdirect.com/product/2dagcll0qu-0046-464/id-61004307|defrost heater], [https://www.searspartsdirect.com/model/32smcyz8hy-003048/maytag-msd2554drw-side-by-side-refrigerator-parts|part #12 freezer diagram] You can measure the heater element using an Ohmmeter. Disconnect the power from the fridge and the disconnect the heater from the wiring harness and measure directly across the heater elementelement wires. I don’t know what it is for your model but it should be <100 Ohms and definitely not open circuit.
 
A ''blocked drain'' (parts #23 & #25 Compressor diagram). The drain goes from under the evaporator unit and leads to the evaporator pan under the compartments near the compressor so that the meltwater from the defrost action drains away to be evaporated. If the drain is blocked the water cannot escape and it refreezes after every defrost cycle and the ice subsequently builds up until eventually it covers the evaporator and the evap fan. This can cause the freezer to be warmer than it should be. Once the ice has been defrosted from the evap unit, pour a measured amount of water down the drain in the freezer and check that it all gets to the evap pan.
 
A ''faulty'' [https://www.searspartsdirect.com/product/1i96qabgde-0046-464/id-68233-2|defrost timer], (part #13 Controls diagram). This starts the defrost cycle. The defrost cycle occurs once every ~10 hours and lasts for about 20 minutes. When it starts the compressor and evaporator fan are both turned off and the defrost heater is turned on to melt the ice build up on the evaporator unit. The temperature in the freezer is allowed to rise to aid in the melting of the ice. When the temperature is greater than the set release temperature of the defrost thermostat (>32 F), the heater is turned off and the compressor and evaporator fan are both turned on again to drive the temperature back down again to the set temps. The defrost thermostat re-operates when the temperature has reached its set operate temp (<25F) to be ready for the next defrost cycle 10 hours later. The defrost timer is also reset so as to countdown to the next defrost cycle.
 
The supplier I linked in this answer was only to show where the parts are located. There are other suppliers that may suit you better. Just search for ''MSD2554DRW parts''

Estatus:

open

Editado por: jayeff ,

Texto:

Hi @willr ,
 
Defrost the ice of the evaporator unit by turning off the fridge and allow the ice to melt naturally. You can use a hair dryer on the coolest setting, but only for short periods and not for prolonged use. The evaporator is only made of thin aluminium and it may be damaged if it is exposed to the heat from a hair dryer etc, as it is designed to operate at below freezing temperatures.
 
An iced up evaporator unit can be caused by the following:
 
A faulty [https://www.searspartsdirect.com/product/2dagcll0qu-0046-464/id-61004307|defrost heater], [https://www.searspartsdirect.com/model/32smcyz8hy-003048/maytag-msd2554drw-side-by-side-refrigerator-parts|part #12 freezer diagram] You can measure the heater element using an Ohmmeter. Disconnect the power formfrom the fridge and the disconnect the heater from the wiring harness and measure directly across the heater element. I don’t know what it is for your model but it should be <100 Ohms and definitely not open circuit.
A faulty [https://www.searspartsdirect.com/product/2dagcll0qu-0046-464/id-61004307|defrost heater], [https://www.searspartsdirect.com/model/32smcyz8hy-003048/maytag-msd2554drw-side-by-side-refrigerator-parts|part #12 freezer diagram] You can measure the heater element using an Ohmmeter. Disconnect the power formfrom the fridge and the disconnect the heater from the wiring harness and measure directly across the heater element. I don’t know what it is for your model but it should be <100 Ohms and definitely not open circuit.
 
A ''blocked drain'' (parts #23 & #25 Compressor diagram). The drain goes from under the evaporator unit and leads to the evaporator pan under the compartments near the compressor so that the meltwater from the defrost action drains away to be evaporated. If the drain is blocked the water cannot escape and it refreezes after every defrost cycle and the ice subsequently builds up until eventually it covers the evaporator and the evap fan. This can cause the freezer to be warmer than it should be. Once the ice has been defrosted from the evap unit, pour a measured amount of water down the drain in the freezer and check that it all gets to the evap pan.
 
A ''faulty'' [https://www.searspartsdirect.com/product/1i96qabgde-0046-464/id-68233-2|defrost timer], (part #13 Controls diagram). This starts the defrost cycle. The defrost cycle occurs once every ~10 hours and lasts for about 20 minutes. When it starts the compressor and evaporator fan are both turned off and the defrost heater is turned on to melt the ice build up on the evaporator unit. The temperature in the freezer is allowed to rise to aid in the melting of the ice. When the temperature is greater than the set release temperature of the defrost thermostat (>32 F), the heater is turned off and the compressor and evaporator fan are both turned on again to drive the temperature back down again to the set temps. The defrost thermostat re-operates when the temperature has reached its set operate temp (<25F) to be ready for the next defrost cycle 10 hours later. The defrost timer is also reset so as to countdown to the next defrost cycle.
 
The supplier I linked in this answer was only to show where the parts are located. There are other suppliers that may suit you better. Just search for ''MSD2554DRW parts''

Estatus:

open

Aporte original por: jayeff ,

Texto:

Hi @willr ,

Defrost the ice of the evaporator unit by turning off the fridge and allow the ice to melt naturally. You can use a hair dryer on the coolest setting, but only for short periods and not for prolonged use. The evaporator is only made of thin aluminium and it may be damaged if it is exposed to the heat from a hair dryer etc, as it is designed to operate at below freezing temperatures.

An iced up evaporator unit can be caused by the following:

A faulty [https://www.searspartsdirect.com/product/2dagcll0qu-0046-464/id-61004307|defrost heater], [https://www.searspartsdirect.com/model/32smcyz8hy-003048/maytag-msd2554drw-side-by-side-refrigerator-parts|part #12 freezer diagram] You can measure the heater element using an Ohmmeter. Disconnect the power form the fridge and the disconnect the heater from the wiring harness and measure directly across the heater element. I don’t know what it is for your model but it should be <100 Ohms and definitely not open circuit.

A ''blocked drain'' (parts #23 & #25 Compressor diagram). The drain goes from under the evaporator unit and leads to the evaporator pan under the compartments near the compressor so that the meltwater from the defrost action drains away to be evaporated. If the drain is blocked the water cannot escape and it refreezes after every defrost cycle and the ice subsequently builds up until eventually it covers the evaporator and the evap fan. This can cause the freezer to be warmer than it should be. Once the ice has been defrosted from the evap unit, pour a measured amount of water down the drain in the freezer and check that it all gets to the evap pan.

A ''faulty'' [https://www.searspartsdirect.com/product/1i96qabgde-0046-464/id-68233-2|defrost timer], (part #13 Controls diagram). This starts the defrost cycle. The defrost cycle occurs once every ~10 hours and lasts for about 20 minutes. When it starts the compressor and evaporator fan are both turned off and the defrost heater is turned on to melt the ice build up on the evaporator unit. The temperature in the freezer is allowed to rise to aid in the melting of the ice. When the temperature is greater than the set release temperature of the defrost thermostat (>32 F), the heater is turned off and the compressor and evaporator fan are both turned on again to drive the temperature back down again to the set temps. The defrost thermostat re-operates when the temperature has reached its set operate temp (<25F) to be ready for the next defrost cycle 10 hours later. The defrost timer is also reset so as to countdown to the next defrost cycle.

The supplier I linked in this answer was only to show where the parts are located. There are other suppliers that may suit you better. Just search for ''MSD2554DRW parts''

Estatus:

open