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Versión actual por: Thomas Bauer ,

Texto:

From the day that I installed the UP6/E it was difficult to get it to prime, even when I was just switching tanks. I kept relocating the pump lower towards the water tanks. I checked for suction leaks and even replaced hoses.
 
I eventually found that the check valve on the pickup side of the pump was bad. It had a tear in the plastic body of the valve that kept it from preventing back flow. I have not found a source for a replacement valve, but I folded the plastic piece back together and reinstalled it.
 
It primed in mere seconds for the first time since I owned it (5 years about).
 
You can find the check valve right in line with the water supply line where it hooks up to the pump. You’ll notice that this hookup looks slightly longer than the discharge hookup on the other side. That’s because the water supply side is made up of two parts. Take off the two parts and unscrew the two parts to find the check valve. It might just be jammed in the open position or deformed or damaged. My valve was a pain to get out due to water scale buildup. It’s probably best to get the pump on a well lighted, clean workbench right off the bat.
 
=== Update (09/15/2020) ===
 
[image|2201841]
 
[image|2201839]
 
=== Update (03/08/2020) ===
 
Here’s another update on parts for the pump. Contact Info@Mate-USA.com for ordering.
 
As I said before, the nonreturn valve now shows up in the schematic but it is not available to purchase.
 
I put a oneway check valve in the water line between the water tank and pump. That solved the prime problem and pressure loss that caused random activation of the pump
 
As you can see, the prices are prohibitively high. Replacing the seal between the pump and electric motor would cost $92.00
 
I posted the new parts diagram in one of my last updates
 
Answer from Mate USA
 
So, in the UP6/E pump manual, item# 2 the seal is only sold together in a replacement kit that has the gears and faceplate. Part number MR64-000-04/Retail price $92.00 (not kept in stock in US – has to be shipped from Italy)
 
 
 
The brush holder (image below) is part number MR64-000-78/ Retail price $53.50 each (not kept in stock in US – has to be shipped from Italy)
 
 
 
 
 
Item #14 (non-return valve) is not available as a spare part.
 
 
 
Item #26 (image below) is part number MR64-000-49 (sold as a pair)/Retail price $25.20 (In stock in the US)
 
Item #26 is the threaded nipple for the intake and supply side of the pump
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
''Best Regards,''
 
 ''''
 
''Charlotte Sundquist''

Estatus:

open

Editado por: Thomas Bauer ,

Texto:

From the day that I installed the UP6/E it was difficult to get it to prime, even when I was just switching tanks. I kept relocating the pump lower towards the water tanks. I checked for suction leaks and even replaced hoses.
 
I eventually found that the check valve on the pickup side of the pump was bad. It had a tear in the plastic body of the valve that kept it from preventing back flow. I have not found a source for a replacement valve, but I folded the plastic piece back together and reinstalled it.
 
It primed in mere seconds for the first time since I owned it (5 years about).
 
You can find the check valve right in line with the water supply line where it hooks up to the pump. You’ll notice that this hookup looks slightly longer than the discharge hookup on the other side. That’s because the water supply side is made up of two parts. Take off the two parts and unscrew the two parts to find the check valve. It might just be jammed in the open position or deformed or damaged. My valve was a pain to get out due to water scale buildup. It’s probably best to get the pump on a well lighted, clean workbench right off the bat.
 
=== Update (09/15/2020) ===
[image|2201841]
 
[image|2201839]

Estatus:

open

Aporte original por: Thomas Bauer ,

Texto:

From the day that I installed the UP6/E it was difficult to get it to prime, even when I was just switching tanks. I kept relocating the pump lower towards the water tanks. I checked for suction leaks and even replaced hoses.

I eventually found that the check valve on the pickup side of the pump was bad. It had a tear in the plastic body of the valve that kept it from preventing back flow. I have not found a source for a replacement valve, but I folded the plastic piece back together and reinstalled it.

It primed in mere seconds for the first time since I owned it (5 years about).

You can find the check valve right in line with the water supply line where it hooks up to the pump. You’ll notice that this hookup looks slightly longer than the discharge hookup on the other side.  That’s because the water supply side is made up of two parts. Take off the two parts and unscrew the two parts to find the check valve. It might just be jammed in the open position or deformed or damaged. My valve was a pain to get out due to water scale buildup. It’s probably best to get the pump on a well lighted, clean workbench right off the bat.

Estatus:

open