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Versión actual por: Isaac ,

Texto:

FYI, while used as common venacular, a true RJ45 jack is different from the 8P8C jack used in Ethernet . A true RJ45 has a tab on it that prevents insertion into an Ethernet jack and is used for telecom purposes.
 
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modular_connector
 
Just be careful that the RJ45 is actually an 8P8C Modular connector without the security tab. Some Ethernet ports are sold as RJ45 because of this confusion, but they will not work in telecom. Also, the ones designed for telecom will not have the same specs as Ethernet and may not work correctly. (Like using a CAT4 jack with CAT6, it just allows too much interference)
 
All that aside, you might be able to find a decent replacement from a component supplier, such as Mouser:
 
https://www.mouser.com/Connectors/Modular-Connectors-Ethernet-Connectors/_/N-wos3?P=1yzp0ta
 
'''NOTE: Images on Mouser are generic, look at the datasheet for more accurate information.'''
 
You will want to get some good measurements (usually in mm) of the spacing of pins, the height, depth, width, etc to make sure it will fit in the same place. Also, if you are going down this road, start with a flashlight and magnifier to inspect the port. A good cleaning with alcohol might be all it needs, or there could be something like a dust bunny lodged in there. Secondly, inspect the solder connection to the board. These can become loose from the strains on the jack, just like power jacks can. It could be as easy as re-flowing the solder on the original jack.
You will want to get some good measurements (usually in mm) of the spacing of pins, the height, depth, width, etc to make sure it will fit in the same place. Also, if you are going down this road, start with a flashlight and magnifier to inspect the port. A good cleaning with alcohol might be all it needs, or there could be something like a dust bunny lodged in there. Secondly, inspect the solder connection to the board. These can become loose from the strains on the jack, just like power jacks can. It could be as easy as re-flowing the solder on the original jack.

Estatus:

open

Editado por: Isaac ,

Texto:

FYI, while used as common venacular, a trutrue RJ45 jack is different from the 8p8c8P8C jack used in Ethernet . A true RJ45 has a tab on it that prevents insertion into an Ethernet jack and is used for telecom purposes.
FYI, while used as common venacular, a trutrue RJ45 jack is different from the 8p8c8P8C jack used in Ethernet . A true RJ45 has a tab on it that prevents insertion into an Ethernet jack and is used for telecom purposes.
 
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modular_connector
 
Just be careful that the RJ45 is actually an 8P8C Modular connector without the security tab. Some Ethernet ports are sold as RJ45 because of this confusion, but they will not work in telecom. Also, the ones designed for telecom will not have the same specs as Ethernet and may not work correctly. (Like using a CAT4 jack with CAT6, it just allows too much interference)
Just be careful that the RJ45 is actually an 8P8C Modular connector without the security tab. Some Ethernet ports are sold as RJ45 because of this confusion, but they will not work in telecom. Also, the ones designed for telecom will not have the same specs as Ethernet and may not work correctly. (Like using a CAT4 jack with CAT6, it just allows too much interference)
 
All that aside, you might be able to find a decent replacement from a component supplier, such as Mouser:
 
https://www.mouser.com/Connectors/Modular-Connectors-Ethernet-Connectors/_/N-wos3?P=1yzp0ta
 
'''NOTE: Images on Mouser are generic, look at the datasheet for more accurate information.'''
 
You will want to get some good measurements (usually in mm) of the spacing of pins, the height, depth, width, etc to make sure it will fit in the same place. Also, if you are going down this road, start with a flashlight and magnifier to inspect the port.

Estatus:

open

Aporte original por: Isaac ,

Texto:

FYI, while used as common venacular, a tru RJ45 jack is different from the 8p8c jack used in Ethernet .  A true RJ45 has a tab on it that prevents insertion into an Ethernet jack and is used for telecom purposes.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modular_connector

Just be careful that the RJ45 is actually an 8P8C Modular connector without the security tab.  Some Ethernet ports are sold as RJ45 because of this confusion, but they will not work in telecom.

All that aside, you might be able to find a decent replacement from a component supplier, such as Mouser:

https://www.mouser.com/Connectors/Modular-Connectors-Ethernet-Connectors/_/N-wos3?P=1yzp0ta

'''NOTE: Images on Mouser are generic, look at the datasheet for more accurate information.'''

You will want to get some good measurements (usually in mm) of the spacing of pins, the height, depth, width, etc to make sure it will fit in the same place.  Also, if you are going down this road, start with a flashlight and magnifier to inspect the port.

Estatus:

open