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Versión actual por: oldturkey03 (detalles del voto) ,

Texto:

Use compressed air to clean the GPU area out really well.  If that doesn't work, there are a innumerable things that it could be so I would suggest starting simple and checking that the power supply supplying the correct voltages under-load.

Also, for what it’s worth:  Anti-static wrist straps will only set you back between $2 and $5.  It’s pretty good insurance against damaging multi-hundred dollar equipment.  Discharging into the chassis is a good mitigation, but you have to keep re-touching it as you work or else your clothes will build up a charge.  Some microprocessors will die from a zap that you can’t even feel.   The wrist strap goes on your wrist, the clip gets attached to the ground-plane of what you are working on (PCI bracket when working on the card, Chassis when working on an assembled PC, screw hole if working on a bare motherboard).

Estatus:

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Editado por: Isaac ,

Texto:

Use compressed air to clean the GPU area out really well.  If that doesn't work, there are a innumerable things that it could be so I would suggest starting simple and checking that the power supply supplying the correct voltages under-load.

Also, for what it’s worth:  Anti-static wrist straps will only set you back between $2 and $5.  It’s pretty good insurance against damaging multi-hundred dollar equipment.  Discharging into the chassis is a good mitigation, but you have to keep re-touching it as you work or else your clothes will build up a charge.  Some microprocessors will die from a zap that you can’t even feel.   The wrist strap goes on your wrist, the clip gets attached to the ground-plane of what you are working on (PCI bracket when working on the card, Chassis when working on an assembled PC, screw hole if working on a bare motherboard).

Estatus:

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Editado por: Isaac ,

Texto:

Use compressed air to clean the GPU area out really well. If that doesn't work, there are a innumerable things that it could be so I would suggest starting simple and checking that the power supply supplying the correct voltages under-load, especially if the card has it's own power tap.

If you have another system to check the card in, it can quickly tell you if the issue is with the card, or the MoBo/PSU.

Another good idea is to remove every piece of hardware that isn't required to boot the system and test the card. Just reduce variables so you can isolate the issue better
under-load.
Use compressed air to clean the GPU area out really well. If that doesn't work, there are a innumerable things that it could be so I would suggest starting simple and checking that the power supply supplying the correct voltages under-load, especially if the card has it's own power tap.

If you have another system to check the card in, it can quickly tell you if the issue is with the card, or the MoBo/PSU.

Another good idea is to remove every piece of hardware that isn't required to boot the system and test the card. Just reduce variables so you can isolate the issue better
under-load.
 
Also, for what it’s worth: Anti-static wrist straps will only set you back between $2 and $5. It’s pretty good insurance against damaging multi-hundred dollar equipment. Discharging into the chassis is a good mitigation, but you have to keep re-touching it as you work or else your clothes will build up a charge. Some microprocessors will die from a zap that you can’t even feel. The wrist strap goes on your wrist, the clip gets attached to the ground-plane of what you are working on (PCI bracket when working on the card, Chassis when working on an assembled PC, screw hole if working on a bare motherboard).

Estatus:

open

Editado por: Isaac ,

Texto:

Use compressed air to clean the PCIe 16x slotGPU area out really well. If that doesn't work, there are a innumerable things that it could be so I would suggest starting simple and checking that the power supply supplying the correct voltages under-load, especially if the card has it's own power tap.
Use compressed air to clean the PCIe 16x slotGPU area out really well. If that doesn't work, there are a innumerable things that it could be so I would suggest starting simple and checking that the power supply supplying the correct voltages under-load, especially if the card has it's own power tap.
 
If you have another system to check the card in, it can quickly tell you if the issue is with the card, or the MoBo/PSU.
 
Another good idea is to remove every piece of hardware that isn't required to boot the system and test the card. Just reduce variables so you can isolate the issue better.
 
Also, for what it’s worth: Anti-static wrist straps will only set you back between $2 and $5. It’s pretty good insurance against damaging multi-hundred dollar equipment. Discharging into the chassis is a good mitigation, but you have to keep re-touching it as you work or else your clothes will build up a charge. Some microprocessors will die from a zap that you can’t even feel. The wrist strap goes on your wrist, the clip gets attached to the ground-plane of what you are working on (PCI bracket when working on the card, Chassis when working on an assembled PC, screw hole if working on a bare motherboard).

Estatus:

open

Aporte original por: Isaac ,

Texto:

Use compressed air to clean the PCIe 16x slot out really well.  If that doesn't work, there are a innumerable things that it could be so I would suggest starting simple and checking that the power supply supplying the correct voltages under-load, especially if the card has it's own power tap.

If you have another system to check the card in, it can quickly tell you if the issue is with the card, or the MoBo/PSU.

Another good idea is to remove every piece of hardware that isn't required to boot the system and test the card.  Just reduce variables so you can isolate the issue better.

Also, for what it’s worth:  Anti-static wrist straps will only set you back between $2 and $5.  It’s pretty good insurance against damaging multi-hundred dollar equipment.  Discharging into the chassis is a good mitigation, but you have to keep re-touching it as you work or else your clothes will build up a charge.  Some microprocessors will die from a zap that you can’t even feel.   The wrist strap goes on your wrist, the clip gets attached to the ground-plane of what you are working on (PCI bracket when working on the card, Chassis when working on an assembled PC, screw hole if working on a bare motherboard).

Estatus:

open