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Versión actual por: rdklinc ,

Texto:

Was this laptop behaving correctly when it was in your possession, or was it like this when you got it? If it worked at one point, was there a particular event after which the behavior started?
I would remove the battery entirely -- when troubleshooting, it's necessary to eliminate extraneous components, and since it works on battery power, we know it's not the battery.
My gut tells me it's a board issue, but as someone who doesn't repair boards, here's what I would do: Verify you get the same behavior with another charger. If this was a 15" machine, I'd verify you have an 85W charger (15" won't power on with 60W), but this is a 13" machine, so that shouldn't be the problem.
Once the charger is ruled out, I'd take out the board, eliminate any dust and corrosion you find, and then I would disconnect the DC-in, let the DC-in and board sit separately and disconnected from power for a few hours, and then put the machine back together. Sometimes a DC-in will acquire what I think of as a "bad charge", and disconnecting it and letting it sit allows it to dissipate.
Also, make sure the DC-in is aligned correctly. I do this by connecting it to power while its screws are out, and putting the screws in at that point so that you can verify the connector is straight as you tighten them.
-Also, check for metal fragments/staples in the DC-in. I'd actually probably do that before any of this.
+Also, check for metal fragments/staples in the DC-in. I'd actually probably do that before any of this, now that I'm thinking about it....

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open

Editado por: rdklinc ,

Texto:

Was this laptop behaving correctly when it was in your possession, or was it like this when you got it? If it worked at one point, was there a particular event after which the behavior started?
I would remove the battery entirely -- when troubleshooting, it's necessary to eliminate extraneous components, and since it works on battery power, we know it's not the battery.
My gut tells me it's a board issue, but as someone who doesn't repair boards, here's what I would do: Verify you get the same behavior with another charger. If this was a 15" machine, I'd verify you have an 85W charger (15" won't power on with 60W), but this is a 13" machine, so that shouldn't be the problem.
Once the charger is ruled out, I'd take out the board, eliminate any dust and corrosion you find, and then I would disconnect the DC-in, let the DC-in and board sit separately and disconnected from power for a few hours, and then put the machine back together. Sometimes a DC-in will acquire what I think of as a "bad charge", and disconnecting it and letting it sit allows it to dissipate.
-Also, make sure the DC-in is aligned correctly. I do this by connecting it to power while its screws are out, and putting the screws in at that point so that you can verify the alignment as you tighten them.
+Also, make sure the DC-in is aligned correctly. I do this by connecting it to power while its screws are out, and putting the screws in at that point so that you can verify the connector is straight as you tighten them.
Also, check for metal fragments/staples in the DC-in. I'd actually probably do that before any of this.

Estatus:

open

Aporte original por: rdklinc ,

Texto:

Was this laptop behaving correctly when it was in your possession, or was it like this when you got it?  If it worked at one point, was there a particular event after which the behavior started?

I would remove the battery entirely -- when troubleshooting, it's necessary to eliminate extraneous components, and since it works on battery power, we know it's not the battery.

My gut tells me it's a board issue, but as someone who doesn't repair boards, here's what I would do:  Verify you get the same behavior with another charger.  If this was a 15" machine, I'd verify you have an 85W charger (15" won't power on with 60W), but this is a 13" machine, so that shouldn't be the problem.

Once the charger is ruled out, I'd take out the board, eliminate any dust and corrosion you find, and then I would disconnect the DC-in, let the DC-in and board sit separately and disconnected from power for a few hours, and then put the machine back together.  Sometimes a DC-in will acquire what I think of as a "bad charge", and disconnecting it and letting it sit allows it to dissipate.

Also, make sure the DC-in is aligned correctly.  I do this by connecting it to power while its screws are out, and putting the screws in at that point so that you can verify the alignment as you tighten them.

Also, check for metal fragments/staples in the DC-in.  I'd actually probably do that before any of this.

Estatus:

open