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Versión actual por: TheFlagCourier ,

Texto:

Here are some steps to find the exact source of the problem.
 
Check the PC's current status for Drives, Memory, and CPU usage.
 
* Windows 7 and Up: Right-click the task bar at the bottom of your primary monitor and choose "Task Manager" from the drop-list. Alternatively you can try accessing it from the rescue prompt using CTRL+ALT+DEL (This may also work for Vista/XP).
* Linux/BSD derivitives: In the terminal, or TTY session, enter the command "top"; alternatively, you can use the program htop, or a graphical application provided by your desktop environment.
* Mac/Hackintosh: No idea, but I believe "top" ''may'' work here, as OS X is heavily based on Unix code.
 
This will show you the aggregate load of each, as well as tell you which process / service is using how much of each.
 
If your CPU load is near to maximum load ( > 95%), you are likely running more than your computer can handle from a logical/arithmetic point of view. You can either upgrade your CPU, CPU+Motherboard; or you can cut down on the high-load applications and services. If you notice a service using "too much" of the device up, you can try killing the process*. On a Unix-like machine (Linux, Mac, BSD), you can use an alternative process scheduler to optimize how programs are handed off to the cpu; I recommend using wiki.archlinux.org for this sort of thing.
 
If the bottleneck is the disk, then upgrading to a faster HDD, a smaller (but faster) SSD, or a middle-of-the-road Hybrid Drive may be in order. You can also try multi-tasking less, and killing unwanted applications and services that tend to constantly read/write to disk. One thing to try is installing two or more drives at the same time and use one for booting, the rest for storage and parity/redundancy. This will balance some of the load, as well as providing more throughput for both the system and the programs. If you just upgraded to Windows 10, a common problem is that the old OS files and services can still bog down your drive unless you installed from a disc/usb key. Resetting the OS to it's defaults from the control panel (reinstalling and re-configuring for a base install experience) can help alleviate the problem. Consult a professional, or do your own research before attempting this.
If the bottleneck is the disk, then upgrading to a faster HDD, a smaller (but faster) SSD, or a middle-of-the-road Hybrid Drive may be in order. You can also try multi-tasking less, and killing unwanted applications and services that tend to constantly read/write to disk. One thing to try is installing two or more drives at the same time and use one for booting, the rest for storage and parity/redundancy. This will balance some of the load, as well as providing more throughput for both the system and the programs. If you just upgraded to Windows 10, a common problem is that the old OS files and services can still bog down your drive unless you installed from a disc/usb key. Resetting the OS to it's defaults from the control panel (reinstalling and re-configuring for a base install experience) can help alleviate the problem. Consult a professional, or do your own research before attempting this.
 
If you are experiencing high-load in Memory usage, there are several things you can do. The easiest thing to do would be to change the paging / swap file on your machine. The instructions for this varies from operating system to operating system, but the general idea is the same: try to match the file size with the total amount of memory installed in your system. If you have eight or more GB of memory or more, using the paging file becomes questionable, as your memory should be able to handle most of what you do without needing it. On linux distributions, you can go even further by changing the "swappiness" value to match your needs as well (or how often the data moves between volatile storage (MEM) and static storage (DISK)). Linux / BSD system also get better benefit from using a swap partition, rather than a swap file; though both are an option.
 
One of the key things to keep in mind is to multi-task less. More tasks = more system load. If you are not using it, close it. Some programs do continue in the background though, or hide themselves in the system tray. You can either kill these processes or close them from the tray.
 
Now if you are a gamer, don't run anything else other than the necessary apps (launcher, game, and any recording service if you can support it.) Closing Origin while using Steam, and vice versa, can free up more for your games to use. Also, turning down graphical enhancements for Windows (or your XServer compositor if on Linux/BSD) can be of great use. Also, if your Antivirus Software supports it, try running it in silent or gaming mode while playing. (Don't forget to return it to normal...)
 
If you are still experiencing problems, or notice a "weird" application on your system, run your antivirus on '''Full System Scan'''. Also, try Anti-PUP/Anti-Malware Software to find things your AV software may not pick up. Some good recommendations are: Avast (AV), Malwarebytes (AM/AP), and CCleaner to clean up orphaned and cache files afterwords. Do not run anything else during a scan (even if you "can") and only run one at a time. The scan will constantly be reading from the drive and tampering with files while this is going on can cause a big headache later on; also your hard drive can only read so many bits at a time.
 
*NOTE: Do not close explorer.exe, your AV program, or any mission-critical softwaresoftware from the task-manager. Don't close anything unless you know exactly what it does. You can attempt to restart them instead, but do not do this while they are in use (Scanning or accessing files at high-speeds.) Do not restart explorer.exe, you may end up with many problems as this is the Windows Desktop environment. Restart (power-cycle) the PC instead if this is an issue.
*NOTE: Do not close explorer.exe, your AV program, or any mission-critical softwaresoftware from the task-manager. Don't close anything unless you know exactly what it does. You can attempt to restart them instead, but do not do this while they are in use (Scanning or accessing files at high-speeds.) Do not restart explorer.exe, you may end up with many problems as this is the Windows Desktop environment. Restart (power-cycle) the PC instead if this is an issue.

Estatus:

open

Editado por: TheFlagCourier ,

Texto:

Here are some steps to find the exact source of the problem.
 
Check the PC's current status for Drives, Memory, and CPU usage.
 
* Windows 7 and Up: Right-click the task bar at the bottom of your primary monitor and choose "Task Manager" from the drop-list. Alternatively you can try accessing it from the rescue prompt using CTRL+ALT+DEL (This may also work for Vista/XP).
* Linux/BSD derivitives: In the terminal, or TTY session, enter the command "top"; alternatively, you can use the program htop, or a graphical application provided by your desktop environment.
* Mac/Hackintosh: No idea, but I believe "top" ''may'' work here, as OS X is heavily based on Unix code.
 
This will show you the aggregate load of each, as well as tell you which process / service is using how much of each.
 
If your CPU load is near to maximum load ( > 85%95%), you are likely running more than your computer can handle from a logical/arithmetic point of view. You can either upgrade your CPU, CPU+Motherboard; or you can cut down on the high-load applications and services. If you notice a service using "too much" of the device up, you can try killing the process*. On a Unix-like machine (Linux, Mac, BSD), you can use an alternative process scheduler to optimize how programs are handed off to the cpu; I recommend using wiki.archlinux.org for this sort of thing.
If your CPU load is near to maximum load ( > 85%95%), you are likely running more than your computer can handle from a logical/arithmetic point of view. You can either upgrade your CPU, CPU+Motherboard; or you can cut down on the high-load applications and services. If you notice a service using "too much" of the device up, you can try killing the process*. On a Unix-like machine (Linux, Mac, BSD), you can use an alternative process scheduler to optimize how programs are handed off to the cpu; I recommend using wiki.archlinux.org for this sort of thing.
 
If the bottleneck is the disk, then upgrading to a faster HDD, a smaller (but faster) SSD, or a middle-of-the-road Hybrid Drive may be in order. You can also try multi-tasking less, and killing unwanted applications and services that tend to constantly read/write to disk. One thing to try is installing two or more drives at the same time and use one for booting, the rest for storage and parity/redundancy. This will balance some of the load, as well as providing more throughput for both the system and the programs. ConsultIf you just upgraded to Windows 10, a common problem is that the old OS files and services can still bog down your drive unless you installed from a disc/usb key. Resetting the OS to it's defaults from the control panel (reinstalling and re-configuring for a base install experience) can help alleviate the problem. Consult a professional, or do your own research before attempting this.
If the bottleneck is the disk, then upgrading to a faster HDD, a smaller (but faster) SSD, or a middle-of-the-road Hybrid Drive may be in order. You can also try multi-tasking less, and killing unwanted applications and services that tend to constantly read/write to disk. One thing to try is installing two or more drives at the same time and use one for booting, the rest for storage and parity/redundancy. This will balance some of the load, as well as providing more throughput for both the system and the programs. ConsultIf you just upgraded to Windows 10, a common problem is that the old OS files and services can still bog down your drive unless you installed from a disc/usb key. Resetting the OS to it's defaults from the control panel (reinstalling and re-configuring for a base install experience) can help alleviate the problem. Consult a professional, or do your own research before attempting this.
 
If you are experiencing high-load in Memory usage, there are several things you can do. The easiest thing to do would be to change the paging / swap file on your machine. The instructions for this varies from operating system to operating system, but the general idea is the same: try to match the file size with the total amount of memory installed in your system. If you have eight or more GB of memory or more, using the paging file becomes questionable, as your memory should be able to handle most of what you do without needing it. On linux distributions, you can go even further by changing the "swappiness" value to match your needs as well (or how often the data moves between volatile storage (MEM) and static storage (DISK)). Linux / BSD system also get better benefit from using a swap partition, rather than a swap file; though both are an option.
 
One of the key things to keep in mind is to multi-task less. More tasks = more system load. If you are not using it, close it. Some programs do continue in the background though, or hide themselves in the system tray. You can either kill these processes or close them from the tray.
 
Now if you are a gamer, don't run anything else other than the necessary apps (launcher, game, and any recording service if you can support it.) Closing Origin while using Steam, and vice versa, can free up more for your games to use. Also, turning down graphical enhancements for Windows (or your XServer compositor if on Linux/BSD) can be of great use. Also, if your Antivirus Software supports it, try running it in silent or gaming mode while playing. (Don't forget to return it to normal...)
 
If you are still experiencing problems, or notice a "weird" application on your system, run your antivirus on '''Full System Scan'''. Also, try Anti-PUP/Anti-Malware Software to find things your AV software may not pick up. Some good recommendations are: Avast (AV), Malwarebytes (AM/AP), and CCleaner to clean up orphaned and cache files afterwords. Do not run anything else during a scan (even if you "can") and only run one at a time. The scan will constantly be reading from the drive and tampering with files while this is going on can cause a big headache later on; also your hard drive can only read so many bits at a time.
 
*NOTE: Do not close explorer.exe, your AV program, or any mission-critical software. Don't close anything unless you know exactly what it does. You can attempt to restart them instead, but do not do this while they are in use (Scanning or accessing files at high-speeds.) Do not restart explorer.exe, you may end up with many problems as this is the Windows Desktop environment. Restart (power-cycle) the PC instead if this is an issue.

Estatus:

open

Aporte original por: TheFlagCourier ,

Texto:

Here are some steps to find the exact source of the problem.

Check the PC's current status for Drives, Memory, and CPU usage.

* Windows 7 and Up: Right-click the task bar at the bottom of your primary monitor and choose "Task Manager" from the drop-list. Alternatively you can try accessing it from the rescue prompt using CTRL+ALT+DEL (This may also work for Vista/XP).
* Linux/BSD derivitives: In the terminal, or TTY session, enter the command "top"; alternatively, you can use the program htop, or a graphical application provided by your desktop environment.
* Mac/Hackintosh: No idea, but I believe "top" ''may'' work here, as OS X is heavily based on Unix code.

This will show you the aggregate load of each, as well as tell you which process / service is using how much of each.

If your CPU load is near to maximum load ( > 85%), you are running more than your computer can handle from a logical/arithmetic point of view.  You can either upgrade your CPU, CPU+Motherboard; or you can cut down on the high-load applications and services. If you notice a service using "too much" of the device up, you can try killing the process*. On a Unix-like machine (Linux, Mac, BSD), you can use an alternative process scheduler to optimize how programs are handed off to the cpu; I recommend using wiki.archlinux.org for this sort of thing.

If the bottleneck is the disk, then upgrading to a faster HDD, a smaller (but faster) SSD, or a middle-of-the-road Hybrid Drive may be in order. You can also try multi-tasking less, and killing unwanted applications and services that tend to constantly read/write to disk. One thing to try is installing two or more drives at the same time and use one for booting, the rest for storage and parity/redundancy. This will balance some of the load, as well as providing more throughput for both the system and the programs. Consult a professional, or do your own research before attempting this.

If you are experiencing high-load in Memory usage, there are several things you can do. The easiest thing to do would be to change the paging / swap file on your machine. The instructions for this varies from operating system to operating system, but the general idea is the same: try to match the file size with the total amount of memory installed in your system. If you have eight or more GB of memory or more, using the paging file becomes questionable, as your memory should be able to handle most of what you do without needing it. On linux distributions, you can go even further by changing the "swappiness" value to match your needs as well (or how often the data moves between volatile storage (MEM) and static storage (DISK)). Linux / BSD system also get better benefit from using a swap partition, rather than a swap file; though both are an option.

One of the key things to keep in mind is to multi-task less. More tasks = more system load. If you are not using it, close it. Some programs do continue in the background though, or hide themselves in the system tray. You can either kill these processes or close them from the tray.

Now if you are a gamer, don't run anything else other than the necessary apps (launcher, game, and any recording service if you can support it.) Closing Origin while using Steam, and vice versa, can free up more for your games to use. Also, turning down graphical enhancements for Windows (or your XServer compositor if on Linux/BSD) can be of great use. Also, if your Antivirus Software supports it, try running it in silent or gaming mode while playing. (Don't forget to return it to normal...)

If you are still experiencing problems, or notice a "weird" application on your system, run your antivirus on '''Full System Scan'''.  Also, try Anti-PUP/Anti-Malware Software to find things your AV software may not pick up. Some good recommendations are: Avast (AV), Malwarebytes (AM/AP), and CCleaner to clean up orphaned and cache files afterwords. Do not run anything else during a scan (even if you "can") and only run one at a time.  The scan will constantly be reading from the drive and tampering with files while this is going on can cause a big headache later on; also your hard drive can only read so many bits at a time.

*NOTE: Do not close explorer.exe, your AV program, or any mission-critical software. Don't close anything unless you know exactly what it does. You can attempt to restart them instead, but do not do this while they are in use (Scanning or accessing files at high-speeds.) Do not restart explorer.exe, you may end up with many problems as this is the Windows Desktop environment. Restart (power-cycle) the PC instead if this is an issue.

Estatus:

open