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Versión actual por: Dan ,

Texto:

Fishy you're bring up a few different issues here: For now lets put aside the WiFi part of the question.
 
We use the term 'Link' to denote the connection between two systems {System A the interconnection between it and System B}. In this Link the slowest part of the link is the limiting factor of the entire link. So if System A & B are equal but I have two connections to pass through and one connection is slower than the otherother, the entire link is limited to this slower connection. Hopefully that makes sense ;-}
We use the term 'Link' to denote the connection between two systems {System A the interconnection between it and System B}. In this Link the slowest part of the link is the limiting factor of the entire link. So if System A & B are equal but I have two connections to pass through and one connection is slower than the otherother, the entire link is limited to this slower connection. Hopefully that makes sense ;-}
 
OK, now lets expand this, When System A is sending it is ''Faster'' than what System B can accept (again both systems are equal). This is a factor on how HD's or even SSD's work. So in order to do any testing you need to have un-equal systems where one is able to accept the data flow faster than the other system is able to sent it.
 
OK, lets tackle the next issue, the transmission of the data flow can't be competing with other data flows over the 'Medium' or slowed by transmission conversion. So as an example an Ethernet cable you plugged directly between two systems back to back can't be interfered with by other competing data flows and there is no conversion taking place (i.e. WiFi to Ethernet).
 
Now the hardest point here the effective data rate of a device and the standard it complies with does not need to be the same. So as an example if you look at the SATA connections of hard drives you'll note none of the current drives achieve a sustained rate of the standard (i.e. SATA III 6.0 Gb/s).
 
This last point may or may not effect you. Here in the states our cable providers offer asymmetric services so the data rate is different depending on the direction. So our download speed is what they brag about in the media as being the fastest but in truth the send speed is pitifully slow! often a 100 to 1 ratio! And to add to this they don't offer you this fast rate only the node your neighbors share with you (maybe 50 or more houses). Talk about bate and switch!
 
So lets put this together the 802.11ac standard offers a data rate that is faster than the interfaces currently on the market. The best one can get though is a burst of a few milliseconds of data that the receiving system can cache as the storage it has can't possibly handle a stream of data that is longer. In the real world competing data flows across the Internet will prevent even the fastest web site to send the data at you at this rate, let alone the limits of the connection your provider offers you locally.
 
Even if you have your own server locally you still have to contend with others around you stepping on your WiFi band so your interface needs to alter its signal and the limits of your own AP also become a factor.
 
I still didn't get into the limits of the system its self here or even the OS and TCP/IP protocol.
 
'''Bottom line here:''' While its a nice check off when your buying new equipment so you have future head room, our current needs and offerings can't support it yet. Will it? Sure, but thats still 3 ~ 5 years from now. And upgrading ones WiFi card in todays systems doesn't make much sense. While its a fun thing to do its not on my list of things I need today.
 
Not trying to be a downer here Fishy, I've been in this business for over 30 years. Yes, there were times when a new standard made me gleeful as I was hitting the wall of the previous standard and the equipment could leverage the new standard (i.e. 802.11g to 802.11n).
 
I do still get a thrill when I hear of something new that I didn't expect. Sorry this is not one I was hitting or see others hitting.

Estatus:

open

Aporte original por: Dan ,

Texto:

Fishy you're bring up a few different issues here: For now lets put aside the WiFi part of the question.

We use the term 'Link' to denote the connection between two systems {System A the interconnection between it and System B}. In this Link the slowest part of the link is the limiting factor of the entire link. So if System A & B are equal but I have two connections to pass through and one connection is slower than the other the entire link is limited to this slower connection. Hopefully that makes sense ;-}

OK, now lets expand this, When System A is sending it is ''Faster'' than what System B can accept (again both systems are equal). This is a factor on how HD's or even SSD's work. So in order to do any testing you need to have un-equal systems where one is able to accept the data flow faster than the other system is able to sent it.

OK, lets tackle the next issue, the transmission of the data flow can't be competing with other data flows over the 'Medium' or slowed by transmission conversion. So as an example an Ethernet cable you plugged directly between two systems back to back can't be interfered with by other competing data flows and there is no conversion taking place (i.e. WiFi to Ethernet).

Now the hardest point here the effective data rate of a device and the standard it complies with does not need to be the same. So as an example if you look at the SATA connections of hard drives you'll note none of the current drives achieve a sustained rate of the standard (i.e. SATA III 6.0 Gb/s).

This last point may or may not effect you. Here in the states our cable providers offer asymmetric services so the data rate is different depending on the direction. So our download speed is what they brag about in the media as being the fastest but in truth the send speed is pitifully slow! often a 100 to 1 ratio! And to add to this they don't offer you this fast rate only the node your neighbors share with you (maybe 50 or more houses). Talk about bate and switch!

So lets put this together the 802.11ac standard offers a data rate that is faster than the interfaces currently on the market. The best one can get though is a burst of a few milliseconds of data that the receiving system can cache as the storage it has can't possibly handle a stream of data that is longer. In the real world competing data flows across the Internet will prevent even the fastest web site to send the data at you at this rate, let alone the limits of the connection your provider offers you locally.

Even if you have your own server locally you still have to contend with others around you stepping on your WiFi band so your interface needs to alter its signal and the limits of your own AP also become a factor.

I still didn't get into the limits of the system its self here or even the OS and TCP/IP protocol.

'''Bottom line here:''' While its a nice check off when your buying new equipment so you have future head room, our current needs and offerings can't support it yet. Will it? Sure, but thats still 3 ~ 5 years from now. And upgrading ones WiFi card in todays systems doesn't make much sense. While its a fun thing to do its not on my list of things I need today.

Not trying to be a downer here Fishy, I've been in this business for over 30 years. Yes, there were times when a new standard made me gleeful as I was hitting the wall of the previous standard and the equipment could leverage the new standard (i.e. 802.11g to 802.11n).

I do still get a thrill when I hear of something new that I didn't expect. Sorry this is not one I was hitting or see others hitting.

Estatus:

open