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Cambios al paso #17

Editado por Miroslav Djuric

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-[* black] The glass over the E-ink screen takes the light from the eight LEDs at the top and evenly distributes it.
- [* black] How you ask?
-[* black] Optics. The glass is specially designed using two principles of optics: internal reflection and diffraction.
-[* black] Light coming from the LEDs goes into the glass which has a [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diffraction_grating|diffraction grating] on it. This diffraction grating bounces the light around using internal reflection. Barnes and Noble really did their homework on this one, because instead of a simple linear diffraction grating, the diffraction grating seems to change throughout the glass to compensate for the local conditions.
+[* black] Light coming from the LEDs goes into the glass, which contains a [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diffraction_grating|diffraction grating] -- an optical component that has slits or grooves as part of its structure. Usually a diffraction grating is a separate piece of an assembly, but B&N's engineers integrated it into the glass.
+[* black] This diffraction grating bends and disperses the light throughout the screen. Barnes and Noble really did their homework on this one, because instead of a simple linear diffraction grating (think of a bunch of parallel slits), the diffraction grating appears to change throughout the glass to evenly disperse the light.
[* black] How do we know its a diffraction grating?
- [* black] [http://shaktronics.com/files/2010/02/big-scary-laser.gif|Lasers]. We took a laser and shined it though the glass panel onto the wall. Unlike the light of the white LEDs found on the Nook, the laser has a very limited wavelength, so when you shine it through the glass you see the diffraction pattern in the picture projected onto the wall.
+ [* black] [http://shaktronics.com/files/2010/02/big-scary-laser.gif|Lasers]. We took a laser and beamed it through the glass panel onto a wall. Unlike the light of the white LEDs found on the Nook, you can see the diffraction pattern in the picture projected onto the wall (the diffraction grating splits the beam). If no diffraction grating was present in the screen, the laser would still be projected as a singular dot on the wall.